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Thread: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

  1. #721
    Au revoir and adieu, Les Expos
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Snively65 View Post
    Ah, ha! So Chuck and Grouchy are neighbors in east-central Cow Hampsha?
    Effingwoods is not in the "east central" part of the state. Effingwoods is a state of mind.

    Gettin' ready for the visit of drumming royalty to your neck of the woods this weekend, mon ami?
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  2. #722
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Snively65 View Post
    Ah, ha! So Chuck and Grouchy are neighbors in east-central Cow Hampsha?
    … but I'm pretty sure we used to be neighbors - at least in one of his prior incarnations.
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  3. #723
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Coach Souza addresses the scoring issue and how Jackson Pierson will be out of the line up until after the break. Said they got good news about his upper body injury. Glad to know he will be ok and back playing. Makes good point that UNH is 'a work in progress' where most teams are at this early stage. Psyched for MI bring on the Wolverines!! GO 'CATS!!
    Let's Go SouzaCats!

  4. #724
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Murray View Post
    Effingwoods is not in the "east central" part of the state. Effingwoods is a state of mind.

    Gettin' ready for the visit of drumming royalty to your neck of the woods this weekend, mon ami?
    His reference to the Ossipee Home for the Aged and his accusation of you throwing empty PBR beer cans in his yard got me thinking that Effingwoods might be a suburb of Effingham. :-)

  5. #725
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snively65 View Post
    His reference to the Ossipee Home for the Aged and his accusation of you throwing empty PBR beer cans in his yard got me thinking that Effingwoods might be a suburb of Effingham. :-)
    I really shouldn’t like you all due to rivalry. However you guys are great!

    So for wildcats fans you might enjoy a YouTube channel I got hooked on... Messi the puma.
    https://youtu.be/_rHp919IAjg

    He was a runt that was taken in due to death concerns, and a Russian couple have been taking care of him. He is adorable and sooo patient. You might find this interesting. Then again you might not. Thought I’d share just the same...

  6. #726
    Yandle in The Wind
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Chuck, you will be happy to know that the UNH Police Department has hired a “comfort dog” for the students. Happy days.

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    More importantly I’m happy to learn that JVR wasn’t the real problem in Toronto...

    It was obviously third-line (tier) coach, Mike Babcock. He was let go - and by a HOF GM, no less - so by definition that means he can’t coach in the first place and his career is a bust. Tough break, he had potential...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    More importantly I’m happy to learn that JVR wasn’t the real problem in Toronto...

    It was obviously third-line (tier) coach, Mike Babcock. He was let go - and by a HOF GM, no less - so by definition that means he can’t coach in the first place and his career is a bust. Tough break, he had potential...
    If you ask me, Toronto should just promote their assistant director of player personnel.

  9. #729
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    More importantly I’m happy to learn that JVR wasn’t the real problem in Toronto...

    It was obviously third-line (tier) coach, Mike Babcock. He was let go - and by a HOF GM, no less - so by definition that means he can’t coach in the first place and his career is a bust. Tough break, he had potential...
    I've been so busy, honestly this is where I first got the news of Babcock getting canned. Not surprised. Actually I was wondering aloud only a few days ago just how much rope they would give him after this year's slow start. Losing two Game 7's to the B's probably took him out of the "let's be patient" mode and into the "he's been here long enough - when do we see progress?" mode. And truth be told, with the talent on hand, the Leafs haven't been improving, or at least not advancing far enough into the post-season. A fair comparison (ironically) would have been the pre-Bowman Red Wings of the '90's. It must have killed - KILLED - the folks up there to see St. Louis take the Cup last Spring, with nowhere near the talent level Babcock has had to work with …

    For an interesting take from north of the border, here's a link to an article that discusses the long line of coaches with credentials who have tried and failed in Toronto (their Cup drought is now over 50 years long - '67 I think - the last one before expansion?). The theory he advances, which is basically "it's tougher to coach in Canada since the fans know more and have higher expectations than south of the border" - I understand what he's saying about the "fishbowl effect", but I don't buy that it ruins good coaches. Bowman and Sather seemed to do OK. Anyway, here's the link:

    https://torontosun.com/sports/hockey...p-and-spit-out

    While taking your long-awaited victory lap, Dan … keep in mind JvR is on a 15 goal pace for a Flyers' team that's dropped their last 4 games, while their second line UNH alum hasn't scored in 5 games. They're 8th place in the East at the moment, only a point or two ahead of the pace that just got Babcock canned. And no doubt, Toronto will be breezing past them in the standings once their overpaid bunch of coach-killing underachievers finally decide it's time to start playing for real. Oh, and maybe Toronto's HoF GM can get some quality defensive help in, too? These guys - Babcock, Shanahan, etc. - are all fair game. Win or go home.

    ----------

    Finally, as an aside since I'll probably never get a chance to post about anywhere ever that's even tangentially relevant … news from Toronto earlier this week for older DRW fans was surprisingly much better, as the HHOF inducted two former players from the "Dead Wings" era - Jim Rutherford and Vaclav Nedomansky. Of course, Rutherford got in for his front office work around the NHL, not for being a platoon goalie for a lot of years (and a lot of really bad teams), and Big Ned got the nod more for his role in being the first Eastern Bloc player of note to defect to North America. Throw in Rogie Vachon, inducted a few years ago (more for what he did in LA and Montreal), and that's both goalies, your first line center AND your top pairing defenseman (Reed Larson) who are HoF players - albeit Larson only in the US Hockey HoF. Never in my formative years of following hockey did it ever occur to me that those late '70's "Dead Wings" would have one (1) HoF quality player in their ranks … much less 3-and-a-half.

    Deep in my heart, I knew it all along … those guys all had something special going on …

    … oh, and 'dc … yeah, nothing like a little more campus snowflakery, eh? As long as MS7 doesn't go down that path …
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  10. #730
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Murray View Post
    For an interesting take from north of the border, here's a link to an article that discusses the long line of coaches with credentials who have tried and failed in Toronto (their Cup drought is now over 50 years long - '67 I think - the last one before expansion?). The theory he advances, which is basically "it's tougher to coach in Canada since the fans know more and have higher expectations than south of the border" - I understand what he's saying about the "fishbowl effect", but I don't buy that it ruins good coaches. Bowman and Sather seemed to do OK. Anyway, here's the link:

    https://torontosun.com/sports/hockey...p-and-spit-out
    I have been around long enough to remember the 1967 SC won by the Leafs, their 13th and last one. Indeed, that SC was the last before expansion of the NHL. That Leafs team was loaded, with the likes of Frank Mahovlich, Dave Keon (won Conn Smythe that year), Red Kelly (8 SC’s), Pete Stemkowski, Bob Pulford, Eddie Shack, Marcel Pronovost, and Jim Pappin (4 G, 4 A in that SC), with Terry Sawchuck and Johnny Bower (42 yo for his fourth SC) in net, and Punch Imlach as coach (love those nicknames). The Leafs won it in six that year against the Canadians, a team that featured Yvon Cournoyer, Ralph Backstrom, John Ferguson, Henri Richard (the Pocket Rocket), and Jean Beliveau, with Roger Vachon in net.

    Our parents gave my brother and me one of those table top hockey games in the early 60’s, which we played endlessly. There were six metal players per team, which could be switched out on their spring-loaded swivel posts attached to long horizontal metal arms underneath five slots that overlapped the length of the "ice," with rubber-coated twisty knobs at the ends of the board.

    There were on-ice sidewall indentations on both sides at the blue lines, probably to provide structural support to the board, and we immediately discovered that we could trap the little plastic puck against these indentations with the metal D-men and really get the puck to fly with the spring-loaded pivots, much like real slap shots! We had dozens of metal springs on hand for replacements. The metal goalies could not only move back and forth in front of the net, but also outward to the top of the crease to “fight” the center man’s possession of the puck.

    There was a metal plate embedded at the back of each net attached to a wire to activate a red light on the end board to simulate a goal scored. Our father attached two large heavy ballasts from lighting fixtures on the external sides of the boards to mitigate lifting of the entire board into the air with our exuberance. The insides of the boards were painted with dozens of fans waving their arms.

    We knew the names of all 20 players on each of the six teams, and took turns narrating the play by play (one of us for the Bruins, the other brother for one of the other five teams), just like our favorite Bruins radio guy who lived in central New Hampshire at the time (I need to look up his name). I do not recall that many college hockey players made it to the NHL back then, and for years the only American-born NHL player was Tom Williams from Minnesota, who played on the Bruins first line (the BOW Line), with Murray Oliver and John Bucyk (aka The Chief). Fun times.
    Last edited by Snively65; 11-22-2019 at 10:49 AM. Reason: typos

  11. #731
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snively65 View Post
    I have been around long enough to remember the 1967 SC won by the Leafs, their 13th and last one. Indeed, that SC was the last before expansion of the NHL. That Leafs team was loaded, with the likes of Frank Mahovlich, Dave Keon (won Conn Smythe that year), Red Kelly (8 SC’s), Pete Stemkowski, Bob Pulford, Eddie Shack, Marcel Pronovost, and Jim Pappin (4 G, 4 A in that SC), with Terry Sawchuck and Johnny Bower (42 yo for his fourth SC) in net, and Punch Imlach as coach (love those nicknames). The Leafs won it in six that year against the Canadians, a team that featured Yvon Cournoyer, Ralph Backstrom, John Ferguson, Henri Richard (the Pocket Rocket), and Jean Beliveau, with Roger Vachon in net.

    Our parents gave my brother and me one of those table top hockey games in the early 60’s, which we played endlessly. There were six metal players per team, which could be switched out on their spring-loaded swivel posts attached to long horizontal metal arms underneath five slots that overlapped the length of the "ice," with rubber-coated twisty knobs at the ends of the board.

    There were on-ice sidewall indentations on both sides at the blue lines, probably to provide structural support to the board, and we immediately discovered that we could trap the little plastic puck against these indentations with the metal D-men and really get the puck to fly with the spring-loaded pivots, much like real slap shots! We had dozens of metal springs on hand for replacements. The metal goalies could not only move back and forth in front of the net, but also outward to the top of the crease to “fight” the center man’s possession of the puck.

    There was a metal plate embedded at the back of each net attached to a wire to activate a red light on the end board to simulate a goal scored. Our father attached two large heavy ballasts from lighting fixtures on the external sides of the boards to mitigate lifting of the entire board into the air with our exuberance. The insides of the boards were painted with dozens of fans waving their arms.

    We knew the names of all 20 players on each of the six teams, and took turns narrating the play by play (one of us for the Bruins, the other brother for one of the other five teams), just like our favorite Bruins radio guy who lived in central New Hampshire at the time (I need to look up his name). I do not recall that many college hockey players made it to the NHL back then, and for years the only American-born NHL player was Tom Williams from Minnesota, who played on the Bruins first line (the BOW Line), with Murray Oliver and John Bucyk (aka The Chief). Fun times.
    We played that same table top hockey game at the Carter(of overalls fame) Community Building in Lebanon endlessly. There was always someone waiting in the wings to play the "winner." We perfected the slap shots from the D also with some amazing goals and some amazing saves. Some fierce battles took place. We're talkin' the late fifties, early sixties here!
    Last edited by e.cat; 11-22-2019 at 12:12 PM.

  12. #732
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Snively65 View Post
    I have been around long enough to remember the 1967 SC won by the Leafs, their 13th and last one. Indeed, that SC was the last before expansion of the NHL. That Leafs team was loaded, with the likes of Frank Mahovlich, Dave Keon (won Conn Smythe that year), Red Kelly (8 SC’s), Pete Stemkowski, Bob Pulford, Eddie Shack, Marcel Pronovost, and Jim Pappin (4 G, 4 A in that SC), with Terry Sawchuck and Johnny Bower (42 yo for his fourth SC) in net, and Punch Imlach as coach (love those nicknames). The Leafs won it in six that year against the Canadians, a team that featured Yvon Cournoyer, Ralph Backstrom, John Ferguson, Henri Richard (the Pocket Rocket), and Jean Beliveau, with Roger Vachon in net.

    Our parents gave my brother and me one of those table top hockey games in the early 60’s, which we played endlessly. There were six metal players per team, which could be switched out on their spring-loaded swivel posts attached to long horizontal metal arms underneath five slots that overlapped the length of the "ice," with rubber-coated twisty knobs at the ends of the board.

    There were on-ice sidewall indentations on both sides at the blue lines, probably to provide structural support to the board, and we immediately discovered that we could trap the little plastic puck against these indentations with the metal D-men and really get the puck to fly with the spring-loaded pivots, much like real slap shots! We had dozens of metal springs on hand for replacements. The metal goalies could not only move back and forth in front of the net, but also outward to the top of the crease to “fight” the center man’s possession of the puck.

    There was a metal plate embedded at the back of each net attached to a wire to activate a red light on the end board to simulate a goal scored. Our father attached two large heavy ballasts from lighting fixtures on the external sides of the boards to mitigate lifting of the entire board into the air with our exuberance. The insides of the boards were painted with dozens of fans waving their arms.

    We knew the names of all 20 players on each of the six teams, and took turns narrating the play by play (one of us for the Bruins, the other brother for one of the other five teams), just like our favorite Bruins radio guy who lived in central New Hampshire at the time (I need to look up his name). I do not recall that many college hockey players made it to the NHL back then, and for years the only American-born NHL player was Tom Williams from Minnesota, who played on the Bruins first line (the BOW Line), with Murray Oliver and John Bucyk (aka The Chief). Fun times.
    A few "household" names (at least in my house of USA college players making it to the NHL in the 1960's ..... not many but here are a few.

    Red Berenson, Tony Esposito, Bill Masterson, Dennis Hextall, Lou Angotti

  13. #733
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    Game day!! Go 'cats!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by HockeyRef View Post
    Game day!! Go 'cats!!
    Drove up from DC this morning. In Portsmouth now. What time are you getting to Libby’s?

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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by e.cat View Post
    We played that same table top hockey game at the Carter(of overalls fame) Community Building in Lebanon endlessly. There was always someone waiting in the wings to play the "winner." We perfected the slap shots from the D also with some amazing goals and some amazing saves. Some fierce battles took place. We're talkin' the late fifties, early sixties here!
    e.cat you just confirmed the approximate time frame for me. My game was essentially the same but didn't have all the lights etc. My father created our own NHL where each of the 6 teams played each other 5 time, then a 2out of 3 play off of the top 4 and the the Cup series. Played 3 10 minute running time periods. Some big scores on occasion and a much longer season than anticipated. usually 2 games a night with each of us switching off who we were to make it more even. Loved that game! Played after school with friends.
    Thanks for the memory Snively.
    Speaking of hockey, Go Cats!!!!

  16. #736
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snively65 View Post
    I have been around long enough to remember the 1967 SC won by the Leafs, their 13th and last one. Indeed, that SC was the last before expansion of the NHL. That Leafs team was loaded, with the likes of Frank Mahovlich, Dave Keon (won Conn Smythe that year), Red Kelly (8 SC’s), Pete Stemkowski, Bob Pulford, Eddie Shack, Marcel Pronovost, and Jim Pappin (4 G, 4 A in that SC), with Terry Sawchuck and Johnny Bower (42 yo for his fourth SC) in net, and Punch Imlach as coach (love those nicknames). The Leafs won it in six that year against the Canadians, a team that featured Yvon Cournoyer, Ralph Backstrom, John Ferguson, Henri Richard (the Pocket Rocket), and Jean Beliveau, with Roger Vachon in net.

    Our parents gave my brother and me one of those table top hockey games in the early 60’s, which we played endlessly. There were six metal players per team, which could be switched out on their spring-loaded swivel posts attached to long horizontal metal arms underneath five slots that overlapped the length of the "ice," with rubber-coated twisty knobs at the ends of the board.

    There were on-ice sidewall indentations on both sides at the blue lines, probably to provide structural support to the board, and we immediately discovered that we could trap the little plastic puck against these indentations with the metal D-men and really get the puck to fly with the spring-loaded pivots, much like real slap shots! We had dozens of metal springs on hand for replacements. The metal goalies could not only move back and forth in front of the net, but also outward to the top of the crease to “fight” the center man’s possession of the puck.

    There was a metal plate embedded at the back of each net attached to a wire to activate a red light on the end board to simulate a goal scored. Our father attached two large heavy ballasts from lighting fixtures on the external sides of the boards to mitigate lifting of the entire board into the air with our exuberance. The insides of the boards were painted with dozens of fans waving their arms.

    We knew the names of all 20 players on each of the six teams, and took turns narrating the play by play (one of us for the Bruins, the other brother for one of the other five teams), just like our favorite Bruins radio guy who lived in central New Hampshire at the time (I need to look up his name). I do not recall that many college hockey players made it to the NHL back then, and for years the only American-born NHL player was Tom Williams from Minnesota, who played on the Bruins first line (the BOW Line), with Murray Oliver and John Bucyk (aka The Chief). Fun times.
    I must have had the MUCH cheaper version of this game, but loved it. As e.cat said, the slapper from the D-zone was always great for catching the opponent off guard. Seemed like I was always either in search of the ball-bearing puck or trying to bend back one of the rods after a particularly animated matchup.

  17. #737
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    Quote Originally Posted by After the Whistle View Post
    e.cat you just confirmed the approximate time frame for me. My game was essentially the same but didn't have all the lights etc. My father created our own NHL where each of the 6 teams played each other 5 time, then a 2out of 3 play off of the top 4 and the the Cup series. Played 3 10 minute running time periods. Some big scores on occasion and a much longer season than anticipated. usually 2 games a night with each of us switching off who we were to make it more even. Loved that game! Played after school with friends.
    Thanks for the memory Snively.
    Speaking of hockey, Go Cats!!!!
    Good memories ATW:-)

    GO CATS!

  18. #738
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    Re: UNH Wildcats 2019/2020 Ready to Rock and Roll!!

    Quote Originally Posted by After the Whistle View Post
    e.cat you just confirmed the approximate time frame for me. My game was essentially the same but didn't have all the lights etc. My father created our own NHL where each of the 6 teams played each other 5 time, then a 2out of 3 play off of the top 4 and the the Cup series. Played 3 10 minute running time periods. Some big scores on occasion and a much longer season than anticipated. usually 2 games a night with each of us switching off who we were to make it more even. Loved that game! Played after school with friends.
    Thanks for the memory Snively.
    Speaking of hockey, Go Cats!!!!
    When my grandson "almost" started to beat me at our table hockey game I turned it over to his grandmother ... who never faked a win by the grandchildren at anything. She won.
    Glad your memory of the game was enhanced "after the whistle". Another win over Michigan would be uplifting .......

  19. #739
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    Crookshank Engaras Grasso top line Go 'CATS!

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatdc View Post
    Drove up from DC this morning. In Portsmouth now. What time are you getting to Libby’s?
    Commute took 2.5 hours this evening, too late for Libby's, but arrived in time to watch practice from my not so usual general admission, standing-room-only, top row seat, right side of band looking at ice. Usually I stand top row left of band for first period, so hoping that this switch brings us some puck luck tonight. :-)

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