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Thread: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

  1. #81

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Jesus. That music is why we nearly had a revolution in this country.
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  2. #82
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kepler View Post
    Jesus. That music is why we nearly had a revolution in this country.
    Well these guys were the squarest of the square.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slap Shot View Post
    Well these guys were the squarest of the square.
    That stuff isn't square. It's fossilized.
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  4. #84

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slap Shot View Post
    076:37:49 Lovell smiling about seeing mount Marilyn
    I just assumed this was a boobs reference. It's actually the sweetest story ever.

    Mount Marilyn holds a special place in the history of lunar exploration. This 1400-meter tall peak straddling the boundary between Mare Tranquillitatis and Mare Fecunditatis served as a critical landmark as Apollo 11 astronauts descended to the surface. If the landmark was visible at a specified time, the astronauts knew they were on-track.

    Before the Apollo 8 flight the astronauts picked distinctive landmarks along potential landing routes, and Jim Lovell picked Mount Marilyn. Marilyn and Jim, high school sweethearts, were married shortly after Jim graduated from the Naval Academy in 1952. Today is the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 8, and Marilyn and Jim have been married for more than 65 years!

    Lovell first saw Mount Marilyn in person as the Apollo 8 Command Module flew over and he called out the landmark at 72:05:40 Ground Elapsed Time: Lovell: I can see the old second initial point right now, Mount Marilyn.

    Mount Marilyn appears on many Apollo-era technical reports and maps, but the name was not officially recognized by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) until recently. This historic landmark was officially named "Mount Marilyn" on 26 July 2017.
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  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kepler View Post
    I just assumed this was a boobs reference. It's actually the sweetest story ever.
    I always figured most people knew that story, they talked about it in the Apollo 13 movie.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimjamesak View Post
    I always figured most people knew that story, they talked about it in the Apollo 13 movie.
    Which strangely I have never seen.
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  7. #87

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    *record scratch*

    *awkward silence*

    Wait, what?

  8. #88

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Moved Tom Hanks discussion to Movie thread.
    Last edited by Kepler; 07-19-2019 at 11:18 AM.
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  9. #89
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by joecct View Post
    For you born after 1972 - how much do the moon landings mean to you?
    Well, I live in this world every day. I am a Payload Operations Director at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. We manage the NASA science on ISS and make sure that they have the resources (power, cooling, data, commanding links, video, crew access) on an everyday basis. I'm currently serving as the Assistant Payload Operations Manager, which mainly means that I'm stressing out, getting fatter on the candy in the office, and pulling my hair out (literally) trying to take care of three astronauts [until tomorrow, when it's six], keeping them healthy and motivated to do good work to serve our science and engineering clients. It's fascinating, frustrating, and rewarding.

    Before this, I wrangled facility racks around here for a contractor; before that, I built hardware that sits outside on station, keeping big pieces of replaceable equipment in an appropriate temperature range and keeping them from floating away. Before that, I helped develop a science payload. Next month, I hit 20 years in aerospace. I came to UAH because I wanted to work in this community — along the way, I fell in love with a (now-crappy) hockey team.

    Apollo XI is important, but I hate that I missed it.

    A little more of my story: https://gfmorris.net/2014/07/14/back-in-the-saddle-2/

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  10. #90
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    077:12:07 Aldrin Roger. Seems to me, since we know orbits so precisely, and know where the stars are so precisely, and the time of setting of a star or a planet to so very fine a degree, that this might be a pretty good means of measuring the altitude of the horizon ...
    077:12:32 Mission Control Roger.
    077:12:51 Armstrong Hey, Houston. I'm looking north up toward Aristarchus now, and I can't really tell at that distance whether I am really looking at Aristarchus, but there's an area that is considerably more illuminated than the surrounding area. It just has - seems to have a slight amount of fluorescence to it. A crater can be seen, and the area around the crater is quite bright.
    077:13:29 Mission Control Roger, 11. We copy.
    077:14:23 Aldrin Houston, Apollo 11. Looking up at the same area now and it does seem to be reflecting some of the earthshine. I'm not sure whether it was worked out to be about zero phase to - Well, at least there is one wall of the crater that seems to be more illuminated than the others, and that one - if I'm lining up with the Earth correctly, does seem to put it at about a zero phase. That area is definitely lighter than anything else that I could see out this window. I am not sure that I am really identifying any phosphorescence, but that definitely is lighter than anything else in the neighborhood.
    077:15:15 Mission Control 11, this is Houston. Can you discern any difference in color of the illumination, and is that an inner or an outer wall from the crater? Over.
    077:15:33 Collins Roger. That's an inner wall of the crater.
    077:15:42 Collins No, there doesn't appear to be any color involved in it, Bruce.
    077:15:47 Mission Control Roger. You said inner wall. Would that be the inner edge of the northern surface?
    077:16:00 Aldrin Well, I guess it would be the inner edge of the west-northwest part, the part that would be more nearly normal if you were looking at it from the Earth.
    077:16:19 Mission Control 11, Houston. Have you used the monocular on this? Over.
    077:16:29 Collins Stand by one.
    077:18:00 Collins Roger. Like you to know this quest for science has caused me to lose my lunch. It's supposed to be around here somewhere, but I can't find it.


  11. #91
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    It always interests me how we've gone from a comm style that was very military-rooted to what we have now. What do I mean?

    1. If you say "Roger" these days, you're saying, "I heard you say something but I didn't understand it." If you "Roger" me, I'm going to repeat myself or change my wording. The preferred nomenclature, Dude, is "copy".

    2. We do not use "over" ever, but that's probably because we have better communications equipment these days and have the Quindar to let us know that you've initiated or ended comm (typically with a handset with a big old trigger).

    If you "Shirley" me, I'll know you're serious and tell you to never call me Shirley again.

    3. My wife is finally used to me replying "copy". I have told a waiter "that's a good copy" more than once when they get my order right the first time. I always get a weird look.

    4. The hardest thing that I see with this comm is not having video. We so often have video with the crew and can get non-verbal cues (thumbs-up always helps) that I can't imagine using our crappy words to ask about amazing things that a crew sees. We're going to have to break ourselves of that crutch if/when we go to Mars...

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  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by gfmorris View Post
    It always interests me how we've gone from a comm style that was very military-rooted to what we have now. What do I mean?

    1. If you say "Roger" these days, you're saying, "I heard you say something but I didn't understand it." If you "Roger" me, I'm going to repeat myself or change my wording. The preferred nomenclature, Dude, is "copy".

    2. We do not use "over" ever, but that's probably because we have better communications equipment these days and have the Quindar to let us know that you've initiated or ended comm (typically with a handset with a big old trigger).

    If you "Shirley" me, I'll know you're serious and tell you to never call me Shirley again.

    3. My wife is finally used to me replying "copy". I have told a waiter "that's a good copy" more than once when they get my order right the first time. I always get a weird look.

    4. The hardest thing that I see with this comm is not having video. We so often have video with the crew and can get non-verbal cues (thumbs-up always helps) that I can't imagine using our crappy words to ask about amazing things that a crew sees. We're going to have to break ourselves of that crutch if/when we go to Mars...

    GFM
    I imagine the shift from the Apollo era, where the Astronauts were almost exclusively military test pilots, to the Space Shuttle era, which involved hiring plenty of non-military, specialist astronauts, probably has to do with the changes.

  13. #93

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by gfmorris View Post
    Well, I live in this world every day. I am a Payload Operations Director at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. We manage the NASA science on ISS and make sure that they have the resources (power, cooling, data, commanding links, video, crew access) on an everyday basis. I'm currently serving as the Assistant Payload Operations Manager, which mainly means that I'm stressing out, getting fatter on the candy in the office, and pulling my hair out (literally) trying to take care of three astronauts [until tomorrow, when it's six], keeping them healthy and motivated to do good work to serve our science and engineering clients. It's fascinating, frustrating, and rewarding.

    Before this, I wrangled facility racks around here for a contractor; before that, I built hardware that sits outside on station, keeping big pieces of replaceable equipment in an appropriate temperature range and keeping them from floating away. Before that, I helped develop a science payload. Next month, I hit 20 years in aerospace. I came to UAH because I wanted to work in this community — along the way, I fell in love with a (now-crappy) hockey team.

    Apollo XI is important, but I hate that I missed it.

    A little more of my story: https://gfmorris.net/2014/07/14/back-in-the-saddle-2/

    GFM
    This is wonderful. Thank you for sharing this.
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  14. #94
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    I found this on YouTube the other day. Apollo 11 descent to the moon. First few minutes explains the whole procedure, the rest is audio and video.

    Enjoy. https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc
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  15. #95

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Getting close now; around 6 hours to go.

    I've found pairing Mission Control with Sonic Youth works out extremely well.
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  16. #96

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    As if following the telemetry in real time wasn't enough, CBS News will be live streaming their archived footage of the landing in real-time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBdyzTvA3oA
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    We are just 2 hours from the Lunar Module Eagle undocking from the Command/Service Module Columbia.

    After undocking the craft separate, then the Lunar Module begins its decent.



    From this source:

    During the spacecraft’s second pass around the moon, Mission Commander Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Aldrin moved from the CSM into the snug confines of the LM to prepare for detachment, leaving Command Module Pilot Michael Collins to anxiously wait and circle in orbit.

    Next came the “powered descent” of the LM, what Neufeld calls “the most critical and dangerous part of the flight.” After separating from the CSM, Armstrong and Aldrin piloted the 32,000-pound LM for two hours toward the lunar surface. At the last minute, with fuel supplies running dangerously low, Armstrong realized that the computer’s auto-landing program was dropping them in the middle of a boulder-strewn crater.

    “In what’s become a famous moment,” says Neufeld, “Armstrong took over manual control and began maneuvering the spacecraft forward faster so it would skate over the crater to a clear spot beyond it.”
    Last edited by Kepler; 07-20-2019 at 10:50 AM.
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  18. #98

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    For programmers out there, this site has the Apollo Guidance Computer code libraries and a simulation environment. You can run your own Apollo missions.

    Humans are amazing. I hope the criminally insane 33% don't kill us all before we find FTL and leave them behind.
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  19. #99

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Some jokes/sarcasm from our duo as they circle the moon in the LM before they start their descent:

    101:50:16 Armstrong And, one thing I'd appreciate if you could – see if you could - find the -
    101:50:30 Aldrin What?
    101:50:34 Armstrong The map.
    101:50:36 Aldrin Yes. Which one do you want? I've got - -
    101:50:37 Armstrong ...
    101:50:40 Aldrin That it? Where do you want it?
    101:50:52 Aldrin Trade you that for a piece of gum. There it is.
    101:50:59 Armstrong ...
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  20. #100

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    102:09:37 Armstrong Go to AUTO TRACK?
    102:09:38 Aldrin No, not yet - wait until the light goes out. Did that thing want to - Hey, I didn't know that could do that. You don't hear that, huh? (Laughter)
    102:10:01 Aldrin Hear that, too, huh?
    102:10:05 Armstrong Sounds like wind whipping around the trees.

    Interesting to listen to the feed, you can hear a wind whistling/buffeting sound in the audio from the LM.
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