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Thread: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by aparch View Post
    Sam Neill in The Dish, right?
    Yes! That's it.
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Sicatoka View Post
    Is that like when "Gravity" director Alfonso Cuaron was asked by a reporter, "Was it complicated to shoot in space?"

    https://www.nydailynews.com/entertai...icle-1.1490004
    When the movie Lone Survivor came out and the big media blitz was occurring, one of the lead actors was asked by a TV reporter from a major network, "Were you able to talk to the other guys in the battle in order to learn what it was like and how to more accurately play your roles?"

    The actor stared at her for a long time and finally said something along the lines of, "You do realize the name of the move is lone survivor?"
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    32:27:50 Mike has realised that as the spacecraft continues to rotate in its barbecue roll, it will come upon the correct roll angle required for the TV transmission quite naturally. Pitch and yaw are already correct. This attitude will allow the HGA to directly face Earth as well as making the planet visible in one of their large windows. Additionally, from an earlier exchange, he knows that the computer's deadband tolerance is narrow and that the roll rate for the barbecue mode is zero. The spacecraft is only still turning because the thrusters have been disabled. Therefore if he re-enables the thrusters as they reach a roll angle of 261°, then the computer should bring them to a stop at near enough the correct attitude. (AFJ Commentary)

    032:27:50 One problem with this arrangement is that the jet firings are uncoupled. That is, a rotation might be initiated by a single thruster but the direction of that thrust does not act through the spacecraft's centre of mass. Therefore some of the force acts to rotate the spacecraft, but some acts to translate the spacecraft (i.e. like a propulsive manoeuvre) and this affects the trajectory. (AFJ Commentary)

    032:43:23 Based on image measurement and triangulation, three photos of Earth appear to have been taken around this time, AS11-36-5369 to 5371. (AFJ Commentary)

    032:52:27 Mike Collins is sending us this description from about 126,000 [nautical] miles [233,300 km] from Earth. (AFJ Commentary)

    032:54:02 Another pair of photos of Earth, AS11-36-5372 and 5373, have been taken, this timing being based on image measurement and triangulation. (AFJ Commentary)

    033:37:50 Sir Bernard Lovell (1913-2012) was a British physicist who established a radio astronomy in Cheshire, England, where he arranged the construction of what was then the world's largest steerable radio telescope that now bears his name, the 76.2-metre (250-foot) Lovell Telescope. During the early years of space flight, Lovell and his team often tracked spacecraft on their journeys to the moon and planets, on occasion intercepting image transmissions and helping to have them published before the craft's own agencies had done so. (AFJ Commentary)

    033:59:11 This scheduled TV transmission begins with a view out of the window at Earth, but with the zoom lens set to wide angle. This clip is presented in the journal courtesy of Mark Gray. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:07:03 Eidophor was a video projection system that was used in Mission Control for one of the large display screens at the front of the MOCR. It used a slowly rotating disk on which was deposited a film of oil. A scanning electron beam wrote the TV image onto that oil film, causing it to become transparent in some areas. Light was then shone through the film on its way to a screen, as in a conventional projector. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:08:12 The Thunderbirds are the formation aerobatic demonstration squadron of the US Air Force. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:17:45 Duke's rainbow refers to the colours that become visible on the TV picture when the content moves across the field of view at speed. They are an artefact of the way that the camera works. At the moment, the camera is being moved about at speed. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:17:45 In order to save weight in the TV camera, its designers used just one imaging tube whereas a conventional colour TV camera of the time had three (or even four) tubes, one each to image the three primary colours; red, green and blue (and maybe one for fine detail) simultaneously. Having just one imaging tube meant that the three colours were imaged sequentially by rotating a filter wheel in front of the sensor. In this arrangement, each television field (of which there were 60 per second) represented the analysis of the scene in red, then blue, then green, over and over. When the signal reached Earth, engineers would pass it through equipment to reconstruct a full colour signal from these fields. A disadvantage of this was that if anything moved quickly across the field of view, then the separate colour analyses would become visible. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:20:52 Buzz is having fun with the concept of weightlessness. He does some mock push-ups facing the top of frame, then turns over and does more facing the bottom. (AFJ Commentary)

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Some of the dry sense of humor really shines through. Rewound to early in the mission (10:39:37)...
    (As the crew plays around with the camera zooming in on the Earth) Aldrin: "Hey, Houston, You suppose you could turn the Earth a little bit so we can get a little bit more than just water?"
    Mission Control: "Roger 11, I don't think we have control over that. Looks like you'll have to settle for the water."

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    027:27:45 Mission Control (Jim Lovell) How does it feel to be airborne again, Buzz?
    027:27:51 Aldrin Well, I'll tell you, I've been having a ball floating around inside here, back and forth up to one place and back to another. It's like being outside, except more comfortable.
    027:28:03 Mission Control It's a lot bigger than our last vehicle.
    027:28:04 Collins ... kept me busy, I'm ...
    027:28:08 Collins Say again about the last -
    027:28:09 Aldrin Yes. It sure is nice in here.
    027:28:12 Mission Control I said it's a lot bigger than the last vehicle that Buzz and I were in.
    027:28:16 Collins Oh, yes. It's been nice. I've been very busy so far. I'm looking forward to taking the afternoon off. I've been cooking, and sweeping, and almost sewing, and you know, the usual little housekeeping things.
    027:28:30 Mission Control It was very convenient the way they put the food preparation system right next to the NAV station.
    027:28:41 Armstrong Everything is right next to everything in this vehicle.
    027:28:47 Aldrin Not where the waste management is concerned.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    So... long ago (2004) Dr. Mrs. was working for NASA. Being the Dr. Mrs. she is, she got into some interesting files. One of them was Buzz Aldrin's personnel file folder, which was unremarkable. Except, scrawled across the top of it were the triple underlined words, "AS-SHOLE!."

    Dr. Mrs. re-filed the folder and said nothing except to me.
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Lol omg. That’s amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kepler View Post
    So... long ago (2004) Dr. Mrs. was working for NASA. Being the Dr. Mrs. she is, she got into some interesting files. One of them was Buzz Aldrin's personnel file folder, which was unremarkable. Except, scrawled across the top of it were the triple underlined words, "AS-SHOLE!."

    Dr. Mrs. re-filed the folder and said nothing except to me.
    Read the Buzz story I posted earlier. I didn't reference the characteristic commentary.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aparch View Post
    Some of the dry sense of humor really shines through. Rewound to early in the mission (10:39:37)...
    (As the crew plays around with the camera zooming in on the Earth) Aldrin: "Hey, Houston, You suppose you could turn the Earth a little bit so we can get a little bit more than just water?"
    Mission Control: "Roger 11, I don't think we have control over that. Looks like you'll have to settle for the water."
    Awesome. Most of us would crack under such pressure. They were so composed and trained it was like a trip to the cabin.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    I bought these a couple weeks ago. Going to wear them this weekend for sure.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Mission is now at 38:35:30. Next transcript will be at 39 hours in.

    036:10:30 Public Affairs This is Apollo Control at 36 hours 11 minutes. At the present time Apollo 11 is 134,000 nautical miles from Earth. The velocity is 4,216 feet per second. During that last series of transmissions from the crew, we received a status report from Buzz Aldrin and he reported that the crew has, in the past 24 hours, taken no medication. This is similar to the crew status report we received from them last night. We bid them good night at 36 hours 9 minutes or about 2 minutes ago. We anticipate that the crew will probably have a few more housekeeping type chores aboard the spacecraft before they actually turn in and also we'll probably be combining their eat period with the first part of that sleep period. At 36 hours 12 minutes into the flight of Apollo 11, this is Mission Control Houston.

    036:20:06 Mission Control Hello, Apollo 11. Houston. One request: the optics switch to zero. And we're - got a lot of theories on why it maneuvered at seven-tenths a moment ago, Mike, but no real definite answer. We'll be back with you later. Over.

    036:20:22 Collins Okay. No rush, Charlie. Thank you.

    036:27:09 Public Affairs This is Apollo Control at 36 hours, 27 minutes. We have completed the processing of the unscheduled television transmission which the crew sent down from the spacecraft at about 30 hours, 24 minutes Ground Elapsed Time this evening. I would like to repeat that this was an apparent test of the onboard system. The crew turned the television equipment on and left it on for about 52 minutes. Some of the time we will have a picture of the parts of it, we don't have good lock-on, and I will not have a good solid picture. We should also point out that this transmission was made with the OMNI directional antennas, which, of course, don't provide nearly the signal strength that we would get from the high-gain antenna, which would be used. We'll play back the tape of that transmission for you at this time.

    036:52:06 Mission Control Hello, Apollo 11. Houston. Over.

    036:52:10 Collins Houston, Apollo 11.

    036:52:12 Mission Control Roger. Mike, I think we can explain that 0.7 rate. When we - the first time through, you know, we failed to go through the VERB 49, so we had a large error between our actual CDU and desired CDU in roll. And with that situation, the DAP - the vehicle will roll - will maneuver, rather, at a rate that is loaded in, which was three-tenths plus four-tenths rate, and it will limit at four-tenths above the desired rate, so - that is, if we have a large enough angle between the desired and the actual, which we did. So, therefore, the rate was four tenths plus three tenths to give you the seven tenths. Over.

    036:53:08 Collins Okay. Thank you.

    036:53:10 Mission Control Roger.

    037:20:34 Public Affairs At this time Apollo 11 is 137,219 nautical miles from Earth. The spacecraft is traveling at a speed of 4,132 feet per second. Here at Mission Control things have settled down into a rather quiet nighttime routine. We said goodnight to the crew about 36 hours - 36 hours 9 minutes to be exact, a little over a hour ago. We did hear from them once or twice since then and we anticipate that this time are probably getting settled down to begin their 10 hours sleep period. At 37 hours 21 minutes, this is Apollo Control.

    038:26:02 Public Affairs This is Apollo Control at 38 hours 26 minutes. Here in Mission Control, we are presently going through the shift change. Flight Director, Glenn Lunney and his team of Flight Controllers are coming on to replace Gene Kranz. The Capsule Communicator on the upcoming shift will be astronaut Ron Evans. Flight Surgeon, John Ziegleschmidt reported that two of the 3 crewmen apparently began sleeping at about 38 hours Ground Elapsed Time or about 26 minutes ago, and the two that are asleep are Command Module Pilot, Mike Collins and Commander, Neil Armstrong. Lunar Module Pilot, Buzz Aldrin at last report was still awake. We expect the change-of-shift press briefing will occur at about 11:15 Central Daylight Time. At 38 hours 27 minutes this is Apollo Control, Houston.

    Crew will be asleep until 048:09
    Last edited by Slap Shot; 07-18-2019 at 12:45 AM.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Commentary for the same time frame above:

    034:27:22 CWG is Constant Wear Garments, essentially what they wear around the spacecraft when not wearing their suits. It is also used as an undergarment for the suit. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:30:39 The conversion of the spacecraft's sequential colour TV signal to composite colour as used by the TV networks was convoluted. The analogue TV systems at the time were very intolerant of timing errors on the signals and those from the fast-moving spacecraft were particularly excessive. The solution adopted was to record the incoming TV signal onto a broadcast-quality quadruplex videotape recorder. The take-up reel was replaced by a looping system which provided a buffer of tape before it was then fed to a second videotape machine. The first machine was locked to the synchronising pulses in the spacecraft's TV signal. The second was locked to a master clock at the TV electronics site on Earth. Having sorted out the timing issues, a magnetic disc system was used to temporarily store the sequential colour fields so that they would be read out available simultaneously and thereby put together into a standard composite TV signal. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:34:50 TV transmission ends. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:36:58 Impurities in the oxygen and hydrogen reactants for the fuel cells can build up and impair their operation. They are purged from the cells by flowing either of the gases at a high rate across the cell reaction surfaces. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:37:16 Day 2 continues in the next chapter with spacecraft maintenance activities, Flight Plan updates and an experiment. (AFJ Commentary)

    034:46:00 About now, it appears that another photo of Earth is taken, based on image measurement and triangulation. (AFJ Commentary)

    035:14:22 The PAD is interpreted as follows:
    Purpose: This PAD is for a small contingency burn in case the crew decide not to enter lunar orbit. Instead, the burn would set the spacecraft on a precise trajectory for return to Earth.
    Systems: The burn would be made using the large SPS (Service Propulsion System) engine at the rear of the Service Module, under the control of the Guidance and Navigation system.
    CSM Weight (Noun 47): 62,815 pounds (28,492 kg).
    Pitch and yaw trim (Noun 48): +0.97° and -0.20°. These angles represent an initial direction for the gimbal-mounted engine. In this very short burn, the spacecraft's control system will not have an opportunity to make any further adjustment.
    Time of ignition (Noun 33): 70 hours, 54 minutes, 59.44 seconds.
    Change in velocity (Noun 81), fps (m/s): x, -2.8 (-0.85); y, +2.3 (+0.7); z, +6.9 (+2.1). The change in velocity is resolved into three components which are quoted relative to the LVLH (Local Vertical/Local Horizontal).
    Spacecraft attitude: Roll, 269°; Pitch, 149°; Yaw, 312°. The desired spacecraft attitude is measured relative to the alignment of the guidance platform.
    HA, expected apogee of resulting orbit (Noun 44): Not applicable. If this abort burn were to be made, the apogee of the resulting orbit would be over 9999.9 nautical miles, beyond the limit of the computer's display.
    HP, expected perigee of resulting orbit (Noun 44): 22.1 nautical miles (40.9 km). The perigee distance is so low, it intersects the Earth's atmosphere. What this really means is that the spacecraft will re-enter.
    Delta-VT: 7.8 fps (2.4 m/s). This is the total change in velocity the spacecraft would experience and is a vector sum of the three components given above.
    Burn duration or burn time: 1 second.
    Delta-VC: 3.4 fps (1 m/s). Using its ability to independently measure acceleration, the EMS can shut down the engine in case the G&N system fails to do so. This figure, Delta-VC, is slightly lower than Delta-VT because the EMS does not take account of the engine's tail-off thrust.
    Sextant star: Star 1 (Alpheratz, Alpha Andromedae) visible in sextant when shaft and trunnion angles are 218.5° and 22.7° respectively. This is part of an attitude check.
    Boresight star: Not available. This is a second attitude check which is made by sighting on another celestial object with the COAS (Crew Optical Alignment Sight).
    The next five parameters all relate to re-entry, during which an important milestone is "Entry Interface," defined as being 400,000 feet (121.92 km) altitude. Another important point is when atmospheric drag on the spacecraft imparts a deceleration of 0.05 g's.
    Expected splashdown point (Noun 61): 2.65° south, 165.0° west; in the mid-Pacific.
    Range to go: 1,189.9 nautical miles (2,203.7 km). To set up their EMS (Entry Monitor System) before re-entry, the crew need to know the expected distance the CM would travel after Entry Interface.
    Expected velocity at Entry Interface: 36,228 fps (11,042 m/s).
    Time of Entry Interface: 144 hours, 56 minutes and 47 seconds GET. This is the predicted time at which the spacecraft would be at 400,000 feet (121.92 km) altitude.
    GDC align stars: The stars to be used for GDC align purposes are the north set, Deneb and Vega. The align angles are roll, 7°; pitch, 144°; yaw, 68°.
    The PAD includes some additional notes. The SPS propellant tanks are full, so there would be no need to perform an ullage burn to settle their contents. The burn details assume the LM is still docked and the attitude values are based on the guidance platform being aligned per the PTC REFSMMAT.] (AFJ Commentary)

    035:17:53 Verb 16 Noun 20 will reveal the current gimbal angles from the IMU, essentially the spacecraft's attitude in hundredths of a degree with respect to the current REFSMMAT. Noun 22 is for new angles so it seems he is to copy the current angles into a slot for new angles. (AFJ Commentary)

    035:20:13 Verb 50 Noun 18 means please perform an automanoeuvre. (AFJ Commentary)

    035:28:08 The McDonald Observatory is part of the University of Texas at Austin. It is located 260 kilometres southeast of El Paso. After Neil and Buzz place a retroreflector on the Moon, the McDonald Observatory will be used to use laser pulses to establish the Earth/Moon distance with exquisite accuracy. (AFJ Commentary)

    035:28:49 The telescope is only a one-power device whereas the sextant will magnify 28 times. (AFJ Commentary)

    035:37:07 The shaft and trunnion angles are to allow the high-power sextant to be aimed directly at the laser's source. The one-power telescope, on the other hand is really a wide-field device. (AFJ Commentary)

    035:58:26 The computer has 2Kwords of erasable memory to which Mission Control can request access. (AFJ Commentary)

    036:27:00 The PAO announcer would appear to be referring to this video clip. (AFJ Commentary)

    036:27:00 Based on image measurement and triangulation, it appears that about now, another photo of Earth is taken, AS11-36-5375. (AFJ Commentary)

    037:21:00 This concludes the second day of the flight of Apollo 11. The crew will now be out of radio contact with Mission Control for more than 11 hours. (AFJ Commentary)

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Crew is still sleeping but will be awake soon. Still about just over 24 hours from lunar orbit:

    047:41:27 Public Affairs This is Apollo Control at 47 hours 41 minutes into the mission. From all indications the crew is still asleep. We're 41 minutes past the end of the scheduled 10-hour rest period now. Flight Director, Cliff Charlesworth has decided to let the crew remain asleep and not awaken them from the ground. There is no need to awaken them; nothing scheduled in the Flight Plan that requires their attention at this time. Apollo 11 is 160,137 nautical miles from Earth, velocity 3,544 feet per second.

    048:00:16 Public Affairs This is Apollo Control at 48 hours into the Apollo 11 mission. The spacecraft is 160,760 nautical miles from Earth. The distance from the Moon is 64,115 nautical miles. The Earth referenced velocity is 3,529 feet per second. The rest period has now lasted an hour longer than the 10-hour period scheduled. It is extended to 11 hours now. Flight Surgeon says there ate indications that the commander, Neil Armstrong, may be awakening; some stirring around, however, we have not yet put in a call to the crew. The mid-course correction 3, which was scheduled for this afternoon at an elapsed time of 53 hours, 54 minutes, has been canceled. The velocity value for that mid-course is only eight-tenths of a foot per second, so we will not do mid-course correction number 3. We'll continue to standby for either a call from the ground or a call from the spacecraft.

    048:09:00 Mission Control Apollo 11, Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

    048:09:00 Public Affairs This is Apollo Control at 48 hours, 9 minutes. We just put in a call to the crew. Here's that conversation.

    048:09:08 Aldrin Good morning, Houston. Apollo 11.

    Milestones that will occur from the time they awake until their next sleep period:

    048:09:00 Crew wake-up
    048:10:55 Collins jokes about the best kind of CAPCOM
    050:53:58 Music barely audible
    051:29:40 Press conference on Luna 15 with Frank Borman
    053:52:05 News report: Thor Heyerdahl, baseball, porridge eating championship
    054:53:51 Collins says master alarm is a pleasing tone
    055:09:00 Video: TV broadcast
    055:11:19 Kranz "prefer the flight controllers use their consoles for looking at data"
    055:25:20 Collins jokes stagehands don't know where to stand
    055:32:37 Cernan visits the MOCR
    056:03:44 Duke joking about possible wardrobe malfunction
    056:07:46 Jack Schmitt visits the MOCR
    056:34:47 Collins "hello there Earthlings"
    056:38:06 Is collins allowed in the LM?
    056:42:41 Neil sends best wishes to Scout jamboree
    057:25:07 Moon cheese
    058:41:47 Music audible
    059:10:12 Music from crew (unidentified). "Who's on horns?"
    060:51:39 Crew Sleep Period Start
    061:39:55 Entering Lunar sphere of influence
    069:10:24 Crew wake-up

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Jaslow View Post
    Armstrong touched the surface of the moon at 10:56 pm ET. He started to open the hatch at 10:39 pm ET. What time zone did you live in? Are you sure you were outside playing?
    They had landed in the afternoon (Eastern time zone) and had discussed going leaving the lander earlier than scheduled. Possibly around 9PM (See link). My parents called me in early because of this and we watched for about 3 hrs until Armstrong stepped out at the times you stated. That was a long wait at my age then.
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Landing was 4:17p ET, hatch open at 10:56p ET.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    The older boy made an interesting observation today when we were discussing how the computers for Apollo 11 were millions of times less powerful than the computer in a smart phone today. He wondered if we could go to the moon today using the same technology they had in 1969. Your first reaction is likely, "Of course" but think about it for a minute.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slap Shot View Post
    The older boy made an interesting observation today when we were discussing how the computers for Apollo 11 were millions of times less powerful than the computer in a smart phone today. He wondered if we could go to the moon today using the same technology they had in 1969. Your first reaction is likely, "Of course" but think about it for a minute.
    The only reasons we couldn't would be that 1) people have totally forgotten how that was made and programmed (and programming "style" has moved to a totally different realm, where program volume isn't an issue) and 2) over the last 50 years, I suspect that the flight readiness requirements for systems has changed- so I'm not sure that it would actually qualify for flight anymore.

    Assuming that #2 is not a appropriate reason for the thinking, I think 1) is a very serious problem. IMHO, software coding needs to go back to its roots so that it's simpler to understand and develop- autocode has really ruined how software is written. The simple code will also run a whole lot faster, with less processing requirements, etc- which means the best of the best processors will have a pretty easy time of it- so one could really focus on reliability and safety.

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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by alfablue View Post
    The only reasons we couldn't would be that 1) people have totally forgotten how that was made and programmed (and programming "style" has moved to a totally different realm, where program volume isn't an issue) and 2) over the last 50 years, I suspect that the flight readiness requirements for systems has changed- so I'm not sure that it would actually qualify for flight anymore.

    Assuming that #2 is not a appropriate reason for the thinking, I think 1) is a very serious problem. IMHO, software coding needs to go back to its roots so that it's simpler to understand and develop- autocode has really ruined how software is written. The simple code will also run a whole lot faster, with less processing requirements, etc- which means the best of the best processors will have a pretty easy time of it- so one could really focus on reliability and safety.
    I remember reading stories about how we have "lost" the technology -- in that a lot of the documentation went missing, a lot of the tech was cannibalized for future projects or just disappeared, and a lot of the engineers simply were not able to recreate the programs after 40+ years in the dust. I well believe it.

    I do wonder what we could do today with the same proportional NASA budget. But the most efficient use of resources by far is unmanned missions. Once human beings can run on electricity and fit on a chip...
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    Quote Originally Posted by alfablue View Post
    The only reasons we couldn't would be that 1) people have totally forgotten how that was made and programmed (and programming "style" has moved to a totally different realm, where program volume isn't an issue) and 2) over the last 50 years, I suspect that the flight readiness requirements for systems has changed- so I'm not sure that it would actually qualify for flight anymore.

    Assuming that #2 is not a appropriate reason for the thinking, I think 1) is a very serious problem. IMHO, software coding needs to go back to its roots so that it's simpler to understand and develop- autocode has really ruined how software is written. The simple code will also run a whole lot faster, with less processing requirements, etc- which means the best of the best processors will have a pretty easy time of it- so one could really focus on reliability and safety.
    I left it open but these were some of the things we talked about. It's quite interesting to think about.

  20. #80
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    Re: Apollo 11 - 50 years on.

    A big day coming. Recent and upcoming milestones:

    069:10:24 Crew wake-up
    071:33:59 Solar corona visible
    072:17:39 Collins "no more meetings"
    072:29:24 News Report: Fred Haise - Neil is Czar, sports, astrologer
    073:17:24 Crew sees Moon up close for the first time
    073:18:10 Neil jokes about bringing the MOCR to the Moon
    073:20:32 Collins jokes about "The Czar"
    075:29:39 Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) status check
    075:49:44 Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) burn
    075:51:55 Aldrin electrical
    075:56:25 LOI burn shutdown
    075:56:29 Collins loves MIT
    075:59:14 Good burn excitement
    075:53:24 In Lunar Orbit
    076:02:18 Preparing for pictures of Earthrise
    076:06:32 Plenty of earthrises
    076:07:05 Collins wants to void meteors
    076:09:19 Monster mountains
    076:10:36 Geologizing one crater
    076:11:06 Aldrin being "unscientific"
    076:14:32 Collins: "Golly ****! A geologist up here would just go crazy."
    076:15:12 Earthrise on first lunar orbit
    076:21:56 Burn status perfect
    076:34:34 Armstrong: "There's no substitute for actually being here."
    076:37:49 Lovell smiling about seeing mount Marilyn
    076:42:49 Recording comments for posterity
    077:35:00 Armstrong follows Flight Plan
    078:24:11 Video: TV on
    078:57:45 Aldrin says goodbye
    079:49:43 Aldrin: "Let's burn."
    080:13:34 Aldrin talks to "All those listening to the tape"
    080:28:05 Collins wants to stop PTC to get Earthrise
    080:31:19 Collins realizes they're going backwards
    082:20:00 Before earthrise photo
    082:28:55 Aldrin questions Flight Plan
    082:58:30 Armstrong describes spectacular view
    083:20:28 Changing dishes to test communications with Eagle
    083:49:01 Aldrin wants to listen to music
    084:01:14 Aldrin raids the pantry
    084:02:20 Collins amazed at how quickly he has adapted
    084:07:23 Music: John Stewart - Mother Country
    084:11:08 Aldrin wonders about bringing sliderule into LM
    084:11:08 Music: Peggy Lee - Spinning Wheel
    084:13:52 Music: Peggy Lee - Everyday People
    084:17:00 Music: Lou Rawls - Three O'clock in the Morning
    084:22:07 Music: Glen Campbell - Galveston
    084:25:27 Music: Glen Campbell - Gentle On My Mind
    084:28:27 Music: Tennessee Ernie Ford - Take My Hand, Precious Lord
    085:12:50 Music: Barbara Streisand - People
    085:20:24 Music: unidentified
    085:44:52 Aldrin talks about wardrobe function
    085:48:18 Music: unidentified
    085:56:51 Music: unidentified
    086:04:01 Music: Frank Sinatra - It's Nice To Go Trav'ling
    086:12:16 Music: Bettye Swann - Angel Of The Morning
    086:23:04 Music: The Lettermen - Put Your Head On My Shoulder
    086:32:38 Earthrise 16mm and photos Rev 6
    086:32:55 Crew Sleep Period Start
    093:32:40 Crew wake-up

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