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Thread: NCAA Hockey Financials

  1. #41
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    Re: Value of Players

    Quote Originally Posted by pokechecker View Post
    even today, if the Badgers sold out every game that would only be about 1/4 million at best in revenue from tickets, I get that people from WI like brats and cheese, but they'd have to eat a heckuva lot of it to give them an additional 7 million in revenue

    now if they sold beer at LaBahn I'd believe the $7 million in revenue, but they don't
    And there is only 1 stand that sells all the usual fare, so it's hard even to buy something sometimes with the wait. I don't think beer sales would do much, the fans are all old farts who don't drink anymore or maybe have just 1 or young families with kids to drive home safely.
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  2. #42
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    Re: Overall and Earned Profit and Loss

    "An area that needs to be addressed."

    This is going to be fun. (Just try to translate Commish Ackerman’s statement if you have any doubts.)


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/29/s...hlete-pay.html
    Last edited by thirdtime's . . .; 10-29-2019 at 06:02 PM.

  3. #43
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    Re: Overall and Earned Profit and Loss

    Quote Originally Posted by thirdtime's . . . View Post
    "An area that needs to be addressed."

    This is going to be fun. (Just try to translate Commish Ackermanís statement if you have any doubts.)


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/29/s...hlete-pay.html
    I heard on the news this morning it was approved for 2021, but no details

    IMO, it will only make the big stronger and the weak weaker.
    The Labron James types will reap all the benefits and the "stars" of lesser sports will get peanuts
    basically it legalizes and brings above board what is already happening below the table

    the NCAA is a brilliant fabrication, it takes all the blame off the schools, who in turn are the NCAA
    IOW, the NCAA is an organization that does the bidding of the schools

  4. #44
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    Re: Value of Players

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy A View Post
    And there is only 1 stand that sells all the usual fare, so it's hard even to buy something sometimes with the wait. I don't think beer sales would do much, the fans are all old farts who don't drink anymore or maybe have just 1 or young families with kids to drive home safely.
    if LaBahn was sold out for every game, each fan would have to buy about $180 in food each game to come up with the revenue claimed,
    so IOW, if each fan ate 6 brats, 5 chips & cheese wiz, and washed it down with twenty one beers, that would do it

    I think that's doable by the typical Wisconsinite

  5. #45
    2009 NCAA Champions Sean Pickett's Avatar
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    Re: Value of Players

    Quote Originally Posted by pokechecker View Post
    even today, if the Badgers sold out every game that would only be about 1/4 million at best in revenue from tickets, I get that people from WI like brats and cheese, but they'd have to eat a heckuva lot of it to give them an additional 7 million in revenue

    now if they sold beer at LaBahn I'd believe the $7 million in revenue, but they don't
    Since LeBahn opened here are the numbers reported by Wisconsin through 2018:

    Season - ticket revenue - total attendance - average ticket price
    2012-13 - $44,842 - 32,590 - $1.38
    2013-14 - $76,676 - 46,589 - $1.65
    2014-15 - $59,571 - 36,523- $1.63
    2015-16 - $84,045 - 42,398 - $1.98
    2016-17 - $98,640 - 55,315 - $1.78
    2017-18 - $102,612 - 38,505 - $2.66

    Sean
    Women's Hockey East Champions 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2010
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  6. #46
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    Re: Overall and Earned Profit and Loss

    Quote Originally Posted by pokechecker View Post
    I heard on the news this morning it was approved for 2021, but no details

    IMO, it will only make the big stronger and the weak weaker.
    The Labron James types will reap all the benefits and the "stars" of lesser sports will get peanuts
    basically it legalizes and brings above board what is already happening below the table

    the NCAA is a brilliant fabrication, it takes all the blame off the schools, who in turn are the NCAA
    IOW, the NCAA is an organization that does the bidding of the schools
    Well, the NCAA was setup by the schools and is ultimately run by the presidents of the universities.
    Russell Jaslow
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    U.S. College Hockey Online

  7. #47
    2009 NCAA Champions Sean Pickett's Avatar
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    Value of Players

    After I posted I thought more about the professor using the multiplier of the highest paid NHL player vs the average NHL salary and decided to look into it more. The 2019-20 salaries listed on Hockey-Reference.com show a new highest paid player, Mitch Marner, at $16 million and a higher average salary at $3,297,344, but the multiplier is almost the same, 4.85 vs 4.87. However, breaking the numbers down by team shows that Marnerís multiplier for his team is only 3.65, as Toronto has the highest payroll in the league. Looking at each teams' highest paid player vs the average NHL salary show a multiplier range from Marnerís 4.85 to Coloradoís and Calgaryís highest paid players with a low of just 2.05. And when comparing players against their teamís average salary the high is Edmontonís 4.86 to Calgaryís low of 1.92. In a true free market each school would be able to determine the value of their players and not all would receive the same multiplier. Still, I averaged the team and league multipliers for each teamís highest paid player(s) and the team average is just under 3.14 and the league average is just over 3.14. Therefore, I have added a sheet to my spreadsheet that uses the 3.14 multiplier and not Berriís 4.87. Using it shows that the numbers moving even more in the direction of the current scholarship model vs a paid model for the top players.

    I also added a second sheet for each school using the 2017-18 numbers. Since most players are not top performers I added average pay columns to compare the EADA revenue and NCAA reported and earned revenue vs the actual or estimated scholarship and meal allowance amounts each school awarded. It turns out that 9 of the 11 (Iím still waiting on Minnesota State) public schools I have data for awarded more in scholarships and meal allowances than the average pay calculated using the EADA numbers. Ten of the 11 did so using the NCAA reported revenue and all 11 did so using the NCAA earned revenue numbers, with the difference increasing in the favor of the players. Of the 24 private schools, all 16 that offer scholarships awarded more in estimated scholarship amounts than the average pay calculated using the EADA numbers.

    Furthermore, Profosser Berri did not mention (and I overlooked) that if the players were paid then that would be taxable income. As far as I'm aware scholarships and meal allowances are not taxable.

    Sean
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  8. #48
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    Re: NCAA Hockey Financials

    ďThe solution to the N.C.A.A.ís 'modernization problem' already exists.Ē

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/30/o...-athletes.html

    This is really interesting, assuming youíre okay with ďreinforcing the union of sports and scholarship." Among other things, in theory, no one sport would suffer. Bouncy ball stars help pay for ice time.

  9. #49
    2009 NCAA Champions Sean Pickett's Avatar
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    Re: Value of Players

    To make my value of players spreadsheet relevant to the men's forum (where I have also posted this) I had added a sheet that has the 2018 numbers for most of the schools that have menís programs (Army and Air Force donít submit EADA reports and I donít have Armyís NCAA financials, while Iím still waiting on Minnesota State for their 2017 & 2018 NCAA financials). As expected, with the higher revenues for the menís programs most of them donít do as well when it comes to having scholarships and meal allowances being an equal or better value than if the players were paid.

    The schools awarded $42,309,659 in scholarships and another $1,039,948 in meal allowance, just 30.6% of their combined reported EADA revenue (minus Army & Air Force) of $141,507,277. Even when the 10 schools that donít offer scholarships are excluded itís just 34.6% of reported EADA revenue. Both fall far short of the womenís 51.7% of their combined reported EADA revenue going to scholarships and meal allowances ($23,148,059 in scholarships and another $200,983 in meal allowances against $45,205,433 in EADA reported revenue) for all schools and the 64.4% of reported EADA revenue when the 8 non-scholarship schools are excluded. That said, 16 of the 28 public schools that give men's scholarships did give out more in scholarships and meal allowances than the average pay each player would have received based on reported NCAA earned revenue. And the estimated scholarships given out by 10 of the private schools is 59.9% of their reported EADA revenue, so it likely even more of the private schools give out at least 50% of their earned revenue in scholarships and meal allowances.

    Sean
    Women's Hockey East Champions 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2010
    Men's NCAA Champions 2009, 1995, 1978, 1972, 1971

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  10. #50
    2009 NCAA Champions Sean Pickett's Avatar
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    Re: NCAA Hockey Financials

    Quote Originally Posted by thirdtime's . . . View Post
    ďThe solution to the N.C.A.A.ís 'modernization problem' already exists.Ē

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/30/o...-athletes.html

    This is really interesting, assuming youíre okay with ďreinforcing the union of sports and scholarship." Among other things, in theory, no one sport would suffer. Bouncy ball stars help pay for ice time.
    Interesting article. However, I'm not sure that in today's world athletes would want to share any of their endorsement income with the schools, let alone 2/3 thirds.

    Sean
    Women's Hockey East Champions 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2010
    Men's NCAA Champions 2009, 1995, 1978, 1972, 1971

    Watch BU Hockey highlights
    NCAA Hockey Financials
    Women's Division I Longest Hockey Games

  11. #51
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    Re: NCAA Hockey Financials

    Quote Originally Posted by thirdtime's . . . View Post
    ďThe solution to the N.C.A.A.ís 'modernization problem' already exists.Ē
    solution to what problem?

    What is the motivation behind paying college athletes? I can see where the athletes and parents would be for this, but most just seem proud and grateful for the opportunity. And there is the matter of taxes, parents would lose their kid as a credit/deduction (which it could be argued should be the case anyway since the schools are supporting them now).
    Today there is a lot of discussion about white privilege but in the deepest darkest days of Jim Crow laws whites never had the advantage over blacks that athletes today enjoy over the rest of the students. That should be the real discussion, athlete privilege in universities.

    Is it because the world of sophisticated left coast liberals has been turned upside down by Midwesterners who have just fallen off the turnip truck and southern hillbillies who have risen above them in athletic competition? Is it the money managers and lawyers who see more potential clients? Are alumni tired of paying star athletes under the table and want recognition for their efforts? Anybody know?

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