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DC78-82
04-05-2011, 08:16 AM
With all the off season banter about who got wronged, who got pampered, and what should be done about it, I saw this in the local paper today, and, having followed this player's very successful career on an equally successful team, I am proud to say we are town-mates, and maybe this player has learned some lessons worth sharing.

Al Pike: Ferullo frustrated by lost season at Providence

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Jamie Ferullo led Spaulding to back-to-back Division II titles in 2006 and 2007. He is now a member of the ice hockey team at Providence College.

The good news is Jamie Ferullo still has four years of eligibility left. The bad news is his freshman year as a member of the Providence College hockey team didn't live up to expectations.

The freshman forward never saw the ice for the Friars, except in practice and one meaningless, mid-season exhibition game against the US under-18 squad.

A star at Spaulding High School and a solid contributor for the New Hampshire Junior Monarchs, he was little more than a spare part at Providence.

"I went in and worked as hard as I could," Ferullo said. "Things just didn't go my way. I thought I deserved a shot, but that's OK. I'm moving forward. I'm working hard in the offseason and hopefully I'll get an opportunity next year. It's a privilege to play college hockey and it's a privilege to go to a school like Providence. I'll just have to go the extra mile."

To make matters worse, he suffered his third concussion in as many years near the end of January when he was hit in the back of the head with a puck, ending his season and killing his last opportunity to earn ice time.

Then coach Tim Army was fired following a year that yielded nine wins, just one in the last 12 games.

"Coach Army's a real good guy," Ferullo said. "It's not all the coach's fault. The players have to perform too. It wasn't a shock. But it's still surreal that this is a business."

Despite the frustration and the dismissal of the coach who recruited him, Ferullo doesn't plan to transfer.

"It ran through my head," he said, "but I never seriously considered it. I'm ultimately here for school. I'm going to a great school and I'll get a great degree. I'm here because of my hockey skills whether I play or not."

Ferullo, a scholarship player at PC, hopes he gets a chance soon to showcase them. He committed to Providence early. Two and a half years elapsed between the time he committed and the time he actually arrived.

After playing four years for Spaulding, he played two more for the Monarchs and was anxious to get his college career started.

"It's the next level," Ferullo said. "You have to earn a spot. Nothing is really given to you. It was very disappointing. I've been working hard my entire life for this opportunity. It's definitely been a letdown for me and my family. You just have to make yourself better and learn from it.
"After a while it gets depressing," he added. "I tried to go out every day and make myself better and make the guys around me better. Ultimately, you want to have fun and I tried not to be down about it."

He still believes he can play at the Division I level.

"I don't feel I'm way behind guys," Ferullo said. "A lot of guys are bigger than me. When I go into the corner with somebody I don't care how big they are. I'm still going to try and come out with the puck and hopefully create a scoring chance."

Without a head coach, Ferullo and the program are in a state of flux. Right now he's focused on spring workouts and school with finals coming up next month.

All the other freshmen in his recruiting class dressed this year. Ferullo thought he would earn playing time as well.

"I was definitely surprised," he said. "You go in after working hard all summer. I don't expect anything to be given to me. It's been kind of an eye-opening process. This is college hockey. I was definitely surprised. I've tried to embrace it as time has gone on and move forward."

Ferullo didn't get to travel with the team either, not even when the Friars played UNH at the Whittemore Center. Although that was the coach's decision, Ferullo would prefer to be a player, not a spectator, in his first college game at the Whitt.

"I don't want to be walking around in a suit and tie at the place where I first dreamed about playing college hockey while my teammates are on the ice," Ferullo said. "The reason I wanted to play college hockey is because I grew up watching UNH. It's one of the things I'd like to accomplish."

It's been more than a year since he's played in a competitive game.

"It's been very hard," he said. "I've gone through a lot this year as a person, emotionally and physically. It's definitely been hard. That's what college is. Everyone comes in as one of the better players on his previous team. It's been a tough year for me personally, but I think I've taken the proper steps to move forward."

Although he didn't know where he stood on the team, he was reluctant to seek clarification from the coaching staff.

"I was too frustrated," Ferullo said. "I never went and talked to them. I just didn't want to. It's my fault I didn't go talk to them. A lot of kids take the initiative and talk to the coach, but I didn't take that opportunity. I regret it at this point. It's my mistake."

He hopes to get a fresh start next season and apply what he's learned.

"It's been real hard," Ferullo said. "It's been an emotional rollercoaster for me. There have been a lot of downs. There have been some ups, but a lot of downs. It's been eye-opening.

"Ultimately, I don't know what happened this year," he added.



Al Pike is a staff sports writer for Foster's Daily Democrat. He can be reached at 742-4455, ext. 5514, or apike@fosters.com.

joehockey
04-05-2011, 10:58 AM
Great post thanks for sharing - it is all perspecitive. The best players beat themselves up, the kids dressing beat themselves up and some just battle to get a shot. You hope all the players enjoy the ride what ever their role - it is a life shaping experience. The results gained from training, competition, working in a Team framework, setting/achieiving goals are life time skills to win in the game of life! Thanks for posting this perspective.

CanHockGuy
04-05-2011, 11:13 AM
I think it's kind of funny how this guy says he wished he'd spoken up, and this is his fault only. Seems to me that he's said plenty. Hope it works out, and good luck to him. ;)

SlewFoot
04-05-2011, 02:37 PM
Just my two cents. This guy sounds well grounded. Hockey is a great game and anyone who goes to school to play it is blessed. However, for the vast majority its not about being a star hockey player its about getting an education and finding a career you can be happy about. In my opinion, jumping around to different schools, in High School and College, solely for a better hockey experience is nuts.

DC78-82
04-05-2011, 02:51 PM
Exactly- Not only does he see his glass as half full, not half empty, he seems to get the idea that if he wants a refill he's going to have to get it himself, and not rely on the waiter, or blame someone for spilling it, but even if his cup never overflows, he will enjoy every last sip.

I think this is a great attitude, and one we don't often hear about. I hope it's not the last story like this.

Trillium
04-05-2011, 03:09 PM
Thanks so much for sharing this ! It's very timely and puts the other story in good context. He does sound like an awesome individual, and I certainly wish him much success next season. We'll be pulling for him. Who knows, maybe having a new coach will help.

But more importantly, I suspect whatever happens hockeywise, this guy will find a way to great success and happiness in life.

D2D
04-05-2011, 05:16 PM
Not the same as DC's, but here's another story about a college hockey player who has the right priorities. Matt Frattin is one of three players still in the running for the Hobey Baker award that will be awarded on Friday.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/sports/03frattin.html?_r=3

dogwatcher
04-05-2011, 05:56 PM
You can never hear a story like this too many times. Hockey seems to have a lot of kids with wisdom well beyound their years. Many say all the car, bus and plane time with family and friends. The sometimes strange hours to get ice at the expense of other social functions. This seems to make these kids have a sense of commmitment and loyalty that very few understand at such a young age. I for one am glad that my children took the game up. It has given them these values and to this day still invite us to every adult league game at the local rink and out with the team afterwards. This young man has an understanding of life and responsibility that very few adults will ever have. I for one have become a big fan and hope to see him on the ice soon. I know that he will get the most out of his college years and his career after that. He has his head on straight and a passion to succeed that very few do.

OnMAA
04-05-2011, 08:36 PM
With all the off season banter about who got wronged, who got pampered, and what should be done about it, I saw this in the local paper today, and, having followed this player's very successful career on an equally successful team, I am proud to say we are town-mates, and maybe this player has learned some lessons worth sharing.

Al Pike: Ferullo frustrated by lost season at Providence

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Jamie Ferullo led Spaulding to back-to-back Division II titles in 2006 and 2007. He is now a member of the ice hockey team at Providence College.

The good news is Jamie Ferullo still has four years of eligibility left. The bad news is his freshman year as a member of the Providence College hockey team didn't live up to expectations.

The freshman forward never saw the ice for the Friars, except in practice and one meaningless, mid-season exhibition game against the US under-18 squad.

A star at Spaulding High School and a solid contributor for the New Hampshire Junior Monarchs, he was little more than a spare part at Providence.

"I went in and worked as hard as I could," Ferullo said. "Things just didn't go my way. I thought I deserved a shot, but that's OK. I'm moving forward. I'm working hard in the offseason and hopefully I'll get an opportunity next year. It's a privilege to play college hockey and it's a privilege to go to a school like Providence. I'll just have to go the extra mile."

To make matters worse, he suffered his third concussion in as many years near the end of January when he was hit in the back of the head with a puck, ending his season and killing his last opportunity to earn ice time.

Then coach Tim Army was fired following a year that yielded nine wins, just one in the last 12 games.

"Coach Army's a real good guy," Ferullo said. "It's not all the coach's fault. The players have to perform too. It wasn't a shock. But it's still surreal that this is a business."

Despite the frustration and the dismissal of the coach who recruited him, Ferullo doesn't plan to transfer.

"It ran through my head," he said, "but I never seriously considered it. I'm ultimately here for school. I'm going to a great school and I'll get a great degree. I'm here because of my hockey skills whether I play or not."

Ferullo, a scholarship player at PC, hopes he gets a chance soon to showcase them. He committed to Providence early. Two and a half years elapsed between the time he committed and the time he actually arrived.

After playing four years for Spaulding, he played two more for the Monarchs and was anxious to get his college career started.

"It's the next level," Ferullo said. "You have to earn a spot. Nothing is really given to you. It was very disappointing. I've been working hard my entire life for this opportunity. It's definitely been a letdown for me and my family. You just have to make yourself better and learn from it.
"After a while it gets depressing," he added. "I tried to go out every day and make myself better and make the guys around me better. Ultimately, you want to have fun and I tried not to be down about it."

He still believes he can play at the Division I level.

"I don't feel I'm way behind guys," Ferullo said. "A lot of guys are bigger than me. When I go into the corner with somebody I don't care how big they are. I'm still going to try and come out with the puck and hopefully create a scoring chance."

Without a head coach, Ferullo and the program are in a state of flux. Right now he's focused on spring workouts and school with finals coming up next month.

All the other freshmen in his recruiting class dressed this year. Ferullo thought he would earn playing time as well.

"I was definitely surprised," he said. "You go in after working hard all summer. I don't expect anything to be given to me. It's been kind of an eye-opening process. This is college hockey. I was definitely surprised. I've tried to embrace it as time has gone on and move forward."

Ferullo didn't get to travel with the team either, not even when the Friars played UNH at the Whittemore Center. Although that was the coach's decision, Ferullo would prefer to be a player, not a spectator, in his first college game at the Whitt.

"I don't want to be walking around in a suit and tie at the place where I first dreamed about playing college hockey while my teammates are on the ice," Ferullo said. "The reason I wanted to play college hockey is because I grew up watching UNH. It's one of the things I'd like to accomplish."

It's been more than a year since he's played in a competitive game.

"It's been very hard," he said. "I've gone through a lot this year as a person, emotionally and physically. It's definitely been hard. That's what college is. Everyone comes in as one of the better players on his previous team. It's been a tough year for me personally, but I think I've taken the proper steps to move forward."

Although he didn't know where he stood on the team, he was reluctant to seek clarification from the coaching staff.

"I was too frustrated," Ferullo said. "I never went and talked to them. I just didn't want to. It's my fault I didn't go talk to them. A lot of kids take the initiative and talk to the coach, but I didn't take that opportunity. I regret it at this point. It's my mistake."

He hopes to get a fresh start next season and apply what he's learned.

"It's been real hard," Ferullo said. "It's been an emotional rollercoaster for me. There have been a lot of downs. There have been some ups, but a lot of downs. It's been eye-opening.

"Ultimately, I don't know what happened this year," he added.



Al Pike is a staff sports writer for Foster's Daily Democrat. He can be reached at 742-4455, ext. 5514, or apike@fosters.com.

DC...Thanks for sharing. This young man gets it. He takes ownership and responsibility.

mark
01-01-2012, 04:21 PM
Where is Jamie Ferullo now?

I may be just missing it, but I don't see him listed on this year's PC roster?

whoop87
01-01-2012, 11:51 PM
He was on the roster at the start of the season before they played any games. I don't know if he got another concussion or not...or what happened. I have actually played pickup hockey with him - he is a waterbug out on the ice, kind of like Nathan Gerbe from BC in stature. I found this link online:http://www.friars.com/sports/m-hockey/mtt/ferullo_jamie00.html

papulaisle
01-05-2012, 02:43 PM
Great post thanks for sharing - it is all perspective. The best players beat themselves up, the kids dressing beat themselves up and some just battle to get a shot. You hope all the players enjoy the ride what ever their role - it is a life shaping experience. The results gained from training, competition, working in a Team framework, setting/achieving goals are life time skills to win in the game of life! Thanks for posting this perspective.

Agree w. Joe-all. But-rhetorical: why so much about men playing hockey (in a WOMEN"S forum...)? Yes, yes, both (above) are admirable, have their heads screwed on correctly. AND act as role models, examples, for ALL in sports whatever gender.

Bravo to them!

Maybe, too, I see Gary Bettman and the NHL ahead (for ALL male players.) I don't like Gary. One bit. Long time dislike (he has been NHL Commissioner since 1993...)

He doesn't care.

Didn't bother to respond to N Y Times article about fighting, death from violence in this game. As well, the limited options for fighters ('enforcers') to do other than ' fight'. Odious.

Gary focuses on revenues.

Ice hockey will ultimately solve the violence problem or pass by the way. Bettman is currently a MAJOR part of the hold up.

And where else are men to go who excel at this game and love playing? Maybe why, as a fan, currently, I have gone (myself) to women's sports. Nurtured originally by being a Connecticut native and thrilled by the results being achieved at UConn by their basketball women.

Yes, fierce rivalries- but cooperation, passing, play making, etc.

I now mostly will not sit thru a men's game of anything. Games seem, in comparison, testosterone driven (only)- no longer 'sport'. About egos mostly. And I am not alone as more and more fans are turned off by the likes of Gary Bettman, etc., and his/their concepts, objectives.

Too, Canadians sometimes wonder-herein-about their country. "Who are we?", say. Do we Canadians have a NATIONAL identity? Or are we a subset-seemingly, at times- of the States.

I have lived in both countries- all my life. One way to define who you are (what Canada is about, WANTS to be about...) is to push for improvements as suggested by the NY Times article about violence in your wonderful- internationally recognized, national game.