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View Full Version : Here's National Letter of Intent form - what is missing ?



AMcoffee
02-01-2011, 09:05 AM
From this blog, a very good one I might add...

http://www.cnbc.com/id/41356984?__source=RSS*blog*&par=RSS

The terms and conditions of the NLI are very interesting, but it is fascinating to note the sports on there, and a certain one that is NOT.

What would have led to Men's Water Polo as a sport to be included, but ice hockey not ? How many play Men's Water Polo compared to hockey at D1 and D3 schools, and what caused that sport to be singled out ?

BUPhD
02-01-2011, 09:15 AM
What would have led to Men's Water Polo as a sport to be included, but ice hockey not ?

Warm temperatures?

Dirty
02-01-2011, 09:16 AM
I'm filling this thing out and declaring my intent to play for Yale*. They already have one ineligible player, so I'm sure they'll happily welcome another.

LynahFan
02-01-2011, 09:19 AM
From this blog, a very good one I might add...

http://www.cnbc.com/id/41356984?__source=RSS*blog*&par=RSS

The terms and conditions of the NLI are very interesting, but it is fascinating to note the sports on there, and a certain one that is NOT.

What would have led to Men's Water Polo as a sport to be included, but ice hockey not ? How many play Men's Water Polo compared to hockey at D1 and D3 schools, and what caused that sport to be singled out ?
How do you figure that ice hockey is not included when there is a line called "All Other Sports?"

Fortunately for you, Prop 48 will allow you to matriculate with only the barest of reading comprehension skills...

AMcoffee
02-01-2011, 09:29 AM
Of course, "All Other Sports" was intended to include hockey, I saw that.

Given issues related to hockey such as the early commitment problem related to juinors, hockey's long season perhaps getting the commitment date pinned down without having to guess, and larger number of "student athletes" involved than certain other sports called out on the form, why would hockey NOT be on there ?


How do you figure that ice hockey is not included when there is a line called "All Other Sports?"

Fortunately for you, Prop 48 will allow you to matriculate with only the barest of reading comprehension skills...

FlagDUDE08
02-01-2011, 09:50 AM
The listing of sports looks to have to do with the date the NLI is to be signed. Hockey isn't listed (and neither is baseball or lacrosse) because it uses the general dates for signing the NLI, whereas the listed sports have special rules.

Ralph Baer
02-01-2011, 10:14 AM
The listing of sports looks to have to do with the date the NLI is to be signed. Hockey isn't listed (and neither is baseball or lacrosse) because it uses the general dates for signing the NLI, whereas the listed sports have special rules.

I wonder how many of our recruits have spelled Rensselaer incorrectly. :)

du78
02-01-2011, 10:28 AM
Obvioulsy recruits that sign NLI's will be receiving athletic scholarships either partial or full. Hence the Ivy League schools do not have recruits sign them as they do not offer athletic scholarships. I assume this means that recruited walk-ons do not sign them even though they may qualify for other forms of financial aid.

du78
02-01-2011, 10:29 AM
I wonder how many of our recruits have spelled Rensselaer incorrectly. :)

The NCAA should have a pull-down box on an electronic NLI to prevent this from happening. :D:rolleyes:;)

AMcoffee
02-01-2011, 10:58 AM
Thank you, appreciate the insight


The listing of sports looks to have to do with the date the NLI is to be signed. Hockey isn't listed (and neither is baseball or lacrosse) because it uses the general dates for signing the NLI, whereas the listed sports have special rules.

Hokydad
02-01-2011, 03:42 PM
Why does football let players leave and play the following year at another school but in hockey you have to set out a season??

MetMary
02-01-2011, 04:44 PM
If you transfer from one D1 school to another D1 school, the NCAA mandates you sit out a year for men's hockey, basketball, baseball and football. You can transfer from a D1 to D2 or D3 and play without sitting out. Directly from the NCAA website

* Academic year in residence: Research shows that student-athletes who remain at one college or university throughout their academic careers graduate at higher rates than those who transfer. To encourage an academic focus, the NCAA requires Division I student-athletes who transfer from a two-year school and do not meet transfer requirements or transfer from one four-year school to another four-year school to spend one academic year in residence before being eligible to play There are exceptions to the rule:
o If the student-athlete has never transferred before from a four-year school and meets academic requirements, that student-athlete might be able to use the one-time transfer exception (except in baseball, basketball, menís ice hockey or football).
o If the first school dropped the sport of the affected student-athlete
o If the student-athlete never has been recruited, received an athletics scholarship or practiced beyond a 14-consecutive day period at any school or participated in competition before transferring
o If the student-athlete returns to the first school without participating at the second school
o If the student-athlete did not practice or play in his or her sport for two years

Individual colleges or universities and conferences also often have their own rules governing