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View Full Version : What do blocked-shot statistics measure?



spiehler
02-02-2016, 08:09 PM
I haven't found a definition of a block in the rules book or the statistician's book. I guess it's we-know-one-when-we-see-one. Anyway, do counts of blocked shots measure something the defense is doing, poor shot selection on the part of the offense, both, or something else?

FlagDUDE08
02-03-2016, 11:27 AM
I haven't found a definition of a block in the rules book or the statistician's book. I guess it's we-know-one-when-we-see-one. Anyway, do counts of blocked shots measure something the defense is doing, poor shot selection on the part of the offense, both, or something else?

Either one could be true, and it sort of depends on the ebb and flow of the games each team has. In RPI's case this year (as a couple of their players are towards the top in the statistic so I hear; CHS doesn't track blocked shots and I don't know who does), it seems to be what the D is doing. However, if you look at a team that has been having trouble getting shots on net, and blocked shots seems to be a fairly large part of that, you could consider it poor shot selection. There's no real clear-cut answer as to one or the other, so it'd seem to be a product of both.

purpleinnebraska
02-03-2016, 12:09 PM
Collegehockeyinc.com does track these, with a sortable table (and yes, an RPI guy is second in the nation). The stat does tend to be arbitrary from rink to rink. Not as bad as hits, but close. The analytics guys have written a lot about blocked shots. In general, they seem to have more value when done by forwards a long way from the net. With d men close to the net, the effort to stop the shot also tends to screen your goalie. There's also the injury factor.

Big picture, the analytics guys stick to their main theme - If they are shooting the puck, that means you don't have it, and if you don't have it, you're not winning, whether you're blocking a lot of shots or not.

burd
02-03-2016, 01:56 PM
If my teams forwards are going down to block a lot of shots, I think it can be a measure of the team culture--that the forward are buying into their roles and responsibilities in the zone

It might also mean they are spending too much time in the box. :)

IsThereADog
02-03-2016, 02:11 PM
In RPI's case this year (as a couple of their players are towards the top in the statistic so I hear; CHS doesn't track blocked shots and I don't know who does), it seems to be what the D is doing.

I heard on the radio after the QU game that Q had 102 shot attempts on RPI - 48 on goal - not sure how many were blocked, but RPI certainly wasn't shying away from getting bodies in shooting lanes.

mmb5
02-03-2016, 07:09 PM
The definition is in the scorer's judgement would the puck have been a shot on goal if it was not for a defensive skater redirecting the shot from becoming a shot on goal. Yes, they are going to vary widely because it's a split-second decision that involves the scorer having to both call out the shooter and a defensive player, and there is not going to be a review of a peripheral stat. You will also have schools who have employed the same scorers for decades while others constantly cycle students.

pgb-ohio
02-03-2016, 10:38 PM
The definition is in the scorer's judgement would the puck have been a shot on goal if it was not for a defensive skater redirecting the shot from becoming a shot on goal. Yes, they are going to vary widely because it's a split-second decision that involves the scorer having to both call out the shooter and a defensive player, and there is not going to be a review of a peripheral stat. You will also have schools who have employed the same scorers for decades while others constantly cycle students.Agree with all of this, and would add the following:

There will inevitably be many subjective calls as to whether a player is shooting, passing, dumping the puck into the corner, and so on. It's a split second decision as to the player's intent. But once it has been decided that a shot on goal has been attempted, the result will be one of the following:

1. Goal
2. Shot on Goal; Save
3. Pipe
4. Shot Attempt; Wide (Includes Left, Right & Over The Crossbar)
5. Shot Attempt; Blocked.

My understanding is that these are mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories. In other words, every attempt ends up in one -- and only one -- of the above classifications.

One last detail: Pipes can be correctly categorized as wide shots if you don't want to track them separately. But pipes are not shots on goal.

MaizeRage
02-04-2016, 01:06 AM
Big picture, the analytics guys stick to their main theme - If they are shooting the puck, that means you don't have it, and if you don't have it, you're not winning, whether you're blocking a lot of shots or not.

Blocking a shot is like killing a rat. You're better off doing it than not, but if you're doing it all the time, you've got a serious problem.

Timothy A
02-04-2016, 07:36 AM
blocking a shot is like killing a rat. You're better off doing it than not, but if you're doing it all the time, you've got a serious problem.

lol.

FlagDUDE08
02-04-2016, 07:42 AM
I heard on the radio after the QU game that Q had 102 shot attempts on RPI - 48 on goal - not sure how many were blocked, but RPI certainly wasn't shying away from getting bodies in shooting lanes.

We also had a whole bunch when we played BC. Also Union away, evidently.

Dutchman
02-04-2016, 08:16 AM
ECAC Blocked Shots as of 02/04/2016
#1. RPI 477
#2. Quinnipiac 372
#3. Princeton 311
#4. Cornell 304
#5. Harvard 301
#6. Colgate 291
#7. Union 285
#8. Dartmouth 279
#9. Brown 272
#10. Saints 265
#11. Yale 258
#12. Clarkson 252

ECAC Standings as of 02/04/2016
1 Quinnipiac
2 Harvard
3 Rensselaer
4 Yale
5 Dartmouth
6 St. Lawrence
7 Cornell
8 Clarkson
9 Union
10 Princeton
Colgate
12 Brown

Can someone check my numbers?

CLS
02-04-2016, 09:45 AM
I agree with what nmb5 and pgb said, and would add that because of the complexities they mentioned, “blocked shots” isn't a particularly meaningful statistic over a small sample size. For a full college season or half an NHL season, it may be meaningful.

Other than the willingness of the players to block shots, I can think of a couple of coaching/goaltending strategies that could affect the blocked shots stat. A coach could make blocking shots a point of emphasis (John Tortorella seemed to do this when he coached the Ranngers) and enforce it. Or a goalie may prefer that his teammates let him see the shot clearly and discourage blocking shots, at least from long range.

pgb-ohio
02-04-2016, 11:49 AM
... Or a goalie may prefer that his teammates let him see the shot clearly and discourage blocking shots, at least from long range.I feel a vision coming on... wait for it... wait for it...

Ah yes. Washington DC. Verizon Center. 2009 Frozen Four. Title Game. Overtime. Yup. I see at least one goalie who would discourage blocking shots, at least from long range.;)

FadeToBlack&Gold
02-04-2016, 12:20 PM
It's just one way of measuring how boring a team is to watch. :D

mmb5
02-04-2016, 10:13 PM
Agree with all of this, and would add the following:

There will inevitably be many subjective calls as to whether a player is shooting, passing, dumping the puck into the corner, and so on. It's a split second decision as to the player's intent. But once it has been decided that a shot on goal has been attempted, the result will be one of the following:

1. Goal
2. Shot on Goal; Save
3. Pipe
4. Shot Attempt; Wide (Includes Left, Right & Over The Crossbar)
5. Shot Attempt; Blocked.

My understanding is that these are mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories. In other words, every attempt ends up in one -- and only one -- of the above classifications.

One last detail: Pipes can be correctly categorized as wide shots if you don't want to track them separately. But pipes are not shots on goal.

Yes, one classification and one classification only. Excellent job pointing it out.

Also, what is not discussed is what does constitute a shot. I use the rule of anywhere on the ice if it is shot on goal, has to be in the offensive zone to be pipe/wide/blocked.

LTsatch
02-04-2016, 10:50 PM
ECAC Blocked Shots as of 02/04/2016
#1. RPI 477
#2. Quinnipiac 372
#3. Princeton 311
#4. Cornell 304
#5. Harvard 301
#6. Colgate 291
#7. Union 285
#8. Dartmouth 279
#9. Brown 272
#10. Saints 265
#11. Yale 258
#12. Clarkson 252

ECAC Standings as of 02/04/2016
1 Quinnipiac
2 Harvard
3 Rensselaer
4 Yale
5 Dartmouth
6 St. Lawrence
7 Cornell
8 Clarkson
9 Union
10 Princeton
Colgate
12 Brown

Can someone check my numbers?

ECAC goals allowed per game standings, Yale is #1 in this category but 11th in blocked shots. Some teams depend on blocking shots, others depend on stick pressure on the puck ala Yale.

1 Yale
2 Quinnipiac
3 Rensselaer
4 Cornell
5 St. Lawrence
6 Clarkson
7 Harvard
8 Colgate
9 Dartmouth
10 Princeton
11 Union
12 Brown

Decatur Spartan
02-07-2016, 07:11 PM
It matters because that may be the only stat that Michigan State
may lead the nation in. Have to have something to feel good about.
Very little else at Munn Ice Arena to be happy about.