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BlizzardDad
09-22-2015, 07:08 AM
From listings on other sites. Anyone have anything else?

HOLMES, Lillian F University of Vermont Mid-Fairfield U16 (USTour) 2018-19
PARK, Bailey D Yale University 2018-19
WARREN, Talli D University of New Hampshire 2018-19

mattj711
09-22-2015, 09:39 AM
As per Twitter ... to Cornell:

Gillis Frechette, F, St. Paul's (Weston, MA)

Ahockeydad
10-04-2015, 10:10 AM
Girls commit this early?

123kidd
10-04-2015, 05:19 PM
Girls commit this early?

I guess when you're 14 or 15 years old you just know where you want to go. Stepped on campus and just knew...felt right at home and really liked the atmosphere. Yeah right!
Hopefully the coach will agree with your decision.

Rightnut
10-04-2015, 08:35 PM
I guess when you're 14 or 15 years old you just know where you want to go. Stepped on campus and just knew...felt right at home and really liked the atmosphere. Yeah right!
Hopefully the coach will agree with your decision.

There is no commitment without an offer so I am assuming the coach agrees with the decision.

BlizzardDad
10-06-2015, 09:32 AM
I guess when you're 14 or 15 years old you just know where you want to go. Stepped on campus and just knew...felt right at home and really liked the atmosphere. Yeah right!
Hopefully the coach will agree with your decision.


Boys do it all the time why not girls? the girls are probably more mature at this age than the boys.

123kidd
10-06-2015, 09:52 AM
Correct they do. And just like the boys, they change their mind as do coaches. When you verbal as a freshmen in HS it's not coming from the college coach. It's my opinion that at the age of 14-15 you don't understand how important a college setting is to your success on and off the ice.

ARM
10-06-2015, 10:40 AM
Correct they do. And just like the boys, they change their mind as do coaches. When you verbal as a freshmen in HS it's not coming from the college coach. It's my opinion that at the age of 14-15 you don't understand how important a college setting is to your success on and off the ice.College students who aren't athletes and decide at 17 or 18 change their minds as well. It's what people, and young people in particular, do. Early commits might produce a slightly higher percentage of student athletes going in a different direction, but it isn't like there is some magic age at which every player will know exactly what she wants and be happy once she gets there.

Outside of a change in NCAA rules, early commits aren't likely to go away, no matter how much gnashing of teeth they cause.

Rightnut
10-06-2015, 11:36 AM
College students who aren't athletes and decide at 17 or 18 change their minds as well. It's what people, and young people in particular, do. Early commits might produce a slightly higher percentage of student athletes going in a different direction, but it isn't like there is some magic age at which every player will know exactly what she wants and be happy once she gets there.

Outside of a change in NCAA rules, early commits aren't likely to go away, no matter how much gnashing of teeth they cause.

Agreed. And its not the fault of the player. When a school makes an offer to a sophomore and says you have until X date or they will move on to the next girl, what are the recruit and her parents going to do - pass on a possible scholarship so that they have more time? Not likely. Sophomores are being offered right now and they are not given a lot of time to decide. Its certainly a big decision but unless the recruit is truly elite, its too risky to pass up as another offer may not be coming down the road.

Sieve1
10-06-2015, 12:24 PM
Agreed. And its not the fault of the player. When a school makes an offer to a sophomore and says you have until X date or they will move on to the next girl, what are the recruit and her parents going to do - pass on a possible scholarship so that they have more time? Not likely. Sophomores are being offered right now and they are not given a lot of time to decide. Its certainly a big decision but unless the recruit is truly elite, its too risky to pass up as another offer may not be coming down the road.
Boys lacrosse players who had just graduated from 8th grade started announcing their verbal commitments this summer. That's right- before their first day of freshman year in HS. Before ACT, SAT tests or a single game of high school lacrosse. Let's hope women's hockey isn't headed in that directin, but it very well may be.

Rightnut
10-06-2015, 01:19 PM
Boys lacrosse players who had just graduated from 8th grade started announcing their verbal commitments this summer. That's right- before their first day of freshman year in HS. Before ACT, SAT tests or a single game of high school lacrosse. Let's hope women's hockey isn't headed in that directin, but it very well may be.

It is. It is a fact that schools are actively communicating (in a manner within the rules) with 8th & 9th graders. Its only a matter of time before the current standard of offering 10th graders slides down to 9th graders. Schools that for whatever reason are perceived as less attractive destinations are more pro-active in recruiting, hoping to land girls earlier. The recruits at that age don't necessarily know where they stand in the grand scheme of things as there is no Central Scouting list that ranks the girls. Schools don't disclose their "lists". So a girl who may be able to land a spot with a "top tier" hockey school may not know that she is in that crowd and when a "lesser" school comes with an offer, the recruit and her parents are thrilled and jump on it. If they don't know for sure that they are near the top of the rankings, they may not know that they have the "power" to wait on their decision. Schools will wait on the elite players. But there is so much at stake that the pressure to accept is huge for everyone else.

bc6696
10-06-2015, 02:26 PM
I believe that ninth and even eighth graders may become the norm in the future for commitments. I also believe it is not the best practice for the women's college hockey. While many girls who are superstars among their peers at 12, 13, or 14 may remain ahead of the pack in terms of skill, but there are many players that develop significantly in their high school years. I'm sure anyone who has watched their own D's team and opponents while she was going through youth, HS, and Prep hockey has witnessed this: the girls who at 12 was pegged as the next female Syd Crosby, got an offer after sophomore (or earlier) only to see kids on the same team improve later on and surpass the first and receive little or no interest. In the end do college coaches miss out on some exceptional players who blossomed late, because they have used up their roster spots and scholarships? I think this would affect mid to lower tier teams, who may be eager to commit early, lest the "fish gets away". Maybe allowing contractually binding commitments earlier would actually give pause to schools who may otherwise overcommit or take verbal commitments lightly. I don't really know the answer, just seems that this path is not the correct one.

Ted Knight
10-06-2015, 03:32 PM
I believe that ninth and even eighth graders may become the norm in the future for commitments. I also believe it is not the best practice for the women's college hockey. While many girls who are superstars among their peers at 12, 13, or 14 may remain ahead of the pack in terms of skill, but there are many players that develop significantly in their high school years. I'm sure anyone who has watched their own D's team and opponents while she was going through youth, HS, and Prep hockey has witnessed this: the girls who at 12 was pegged as the next female Syd Crosby, got an offer after sophomore (or earlier) only to see kids on the same team improve later on and surpass the first and receive little or no interest. In the end do college coaches miss out on some exceptional players who blossomed late, because they have used up their roster spots and scholarships? I think this would affect mid to lower tier teams, who may be eager to commit early, lest the "fish gets away". Maybe allowing contractually binding commitments earlier would actually give pause to schools who may otherwise overcommit or take verbal commitments lightly. I don't really know the answer, just seems that this path is not the correct one.

there are instances where committing that early is a good thing.
if a player commits that early they are obviously pretty good. the coach sees something in the kid to (VERBALLY) commit a spot on the roster. from that point on its up to the kid to get better. if that player is outstanding as an 8th grader and a D1 school is interested they have now committed to get better and grow in order to keep that spot come junior or even senior year. if that player doesn't take it seriously its not the coaches fault. if the player does the work on and off the ice, as required by all D1 programs, the player will develop as the coach believed and will have no problem keeping that spot. the fact that kids are committing early is a good thing. it keeps their eye on the prize. if they slouch they don't deserve the spot and will be given to a player that does the hard work and deserves it.

Iceburg
10-10-2015, 01:53 AM
Minnesota
Gracie Ostertag...........Defense.........Shattuck 16u........Shakopee, MN

Iceburg
10-10-2015, 09:28 AM
Minnesota
Catie Skaja................F.....................New Prague..............New Prague, MN

Iceburg
10-14-2015, 04:01 PM
Minnesota
Crystalyn Hengler....................D..................Eden Prairie...............Eden Prairie, MN

brookyone
10-14-2015, 04:25 PM
Won't be long there will be players committing that I'll never live to see play college hockey...:eek:

:)

D2D
10-14-2015, 06:33 PM
Won't be long there will be players committing that I'll never live to see play college hockey...:eek:
:)
Maybe we should both go see her play this year before it's too late! ;)

Out of curiosity I checked to see if Miss Hengler played varsity for EP last year. No problem, as a ninth grade defender, playing one of the more difficult schedules in the state, she managed to score 5 goals and 10 assists. She was the second leading scorer on the team for a defenseman, only trailing current Ohio State freshman Lauren Boyle who managed 11 goals and 17 assists in her senior year.

http://www.mngirlshockeyhub.com/stats/team_instance/873864?subseason=175784&tab=team_instance_player_stats&tool=1140403

Iceburg
10-15-2015, 12:24 AM
Maybe we should both go see her play this year before it's too late! ;)

Well, with the Gophers out of town, this would be the weekend to do it. (LINK (http://www.hselitehockey.com/page/show/2087836-girls-elite-league-ccm-nit?subseason=249261)) All of the local future recruits will be in Blaine.

5mn_Major
10-15-2015, 09:54 AM
Maybe we should both go see her play this year before it's too late! ;)

Out of curiosity I checked to see if Miss Hengler played varsity for EP last year. No problem, as a ninth grade defender, playing one of the more difficult schedules in the state, she managed to score 5 goals and 10 assists. She was the second leading scorer on the team for a defenseman, only trailing current Ohio State freshman Lauren Boyle who managed 11 goals and 17 assists in her senior year.

http://www.mngirlshockeyhub.com/stats/team_instance/873864?subseason=175784&tab=team_instance_player_stats&tool=1140403

Equally amazing. Last year, New Prague's #2 scorer was senior Dani Kocina. Its top scorer was 8th grader Catie Skaja with 28 g's and 53 pts.