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Greg A
03-17-2015, 10:11 AM
That's always been my approach, JB. The T eventually stops running (used to be @ 1:00 a.m.??), but I figure you can always get a cab from North Station to Medford if necessary, and it's a lot less expensive than a cab from North Station to NH. :D

Or there's always the option of "sleeping in" at the Garden, like they did after the first round of the '78 Beanpot. :eek: Can only imagine how much *fun* that would have been in the old building, what with the rodent issues, etc.

I always remember my first trip to the Beanpot was for the '79 Finals (BU beat BC :) with several future "Miracle on Ice" US Olympians skating that evening) the following February, and then a month later we went back to see UNH beat Dartmouth in the ECAC Finals. That was my senior year in HS. Good times. :)

First of all, I would say that given the recent issues with the T and the commuter rail, issues that only exacerbate historical failures that both have had in the 50 years I have been riding them (less frequently now), one is taking a risk in relying on them to commute you from and to NH. Easy for me to say that driving is the better option since I live 20 minutes from the Garden by car. But driving is the best option given the relatively low cost of gas, the tolls, and that there are cheaper places to park than those right near the Garden. Last thing you want to do is either miss an overtime because you have to catch the last train out or, worse, watch the overtime and, indeed, miss the last train.

Chuck, I was at the '78 Beanpot. Weather forecasting back then wasn't anywhere near what it is now but the reports we had were dire. But regardless, I drove in from Lynn, parked under the Central Artery (remember that) and met my wife inside the lobby at North Station. We watched the first game and part of the second before we decided it was time to leave. It was a bit of an adventure getting home but, as luck would have it, we turned into our street and there in front of us was a plow making its way. We barely got into the driveway where the car sat for the next week. There were folks who wound up staying at the Garden for a night but, fortunately, we weren't among them.

Chuck Murray
03-17-2015, 10:29 AM
First of all, I would say that given the recent issues with the T and the commuter rail, issues that only exacerbate historical failures that both have had in the 50 years I have been riding them (less frequently now), one is taking a risk in relying on them to commute you from and to NH. Easy for me to say that driving is the better option since I live 20 minutes from the Garden by car. But driving is the best option given the relatively low cost of gas, the tolls, and that there are cheaper places to park than those right near the Garden. Last thing you want to do is either miss an overtime because you have to catch the last train out or, worse, watch the overtime and, indeed, miss the last train.

One of the old USCHO posters (still with us, but not active here or at The Whitt) always used to make contingency plans, and took the commuter rail in to the games, but had me as a fall-back in case the late game (usually UNH) ran past the final train departure to NH. He never had to cash in that insurance policy, but it's funny to see how we've all dealt with the logistics of getting in and out of town.


Chuck, I was at the '78 Beanpot. Weather forecasting back then wasn't anywhere near what it is now but the reports we had were dire. But regardless, I drove in from Lynn, parked under the Central Artery (remember that) and met my wife inside the lobby at North Station. We watched the first game and part of the second before we decided it was time to leave. It was a bit of an adventure getting home but, as luck would have it, we turned into our street and there in front of us was a plow making its way. We barely got into the driveway where the car sat for the next week. There were folks who wound up staying at the Garden for a night but, fortunately, we weren't among them.

Sounds like you lucked out (or made a really good call) on when to leave, Greg. But yeah, I do remember the old neighborhood around the old Garden/North Station. Always felt like an extended cave at street level, what with the overhead trains up and down Causeway Street (including the Orange Line elevated until they moved that underground) and the nearby Central Artery. All of that is gone now, with the Green Line elevated the last to go, which makes the area much cleaner and brighter.

But I'm surprised it's been close to 20 years now, and they still haven't done anything with the large parcel in front of the TD Garden where the old Garden used to stand. I know they had development plans back when it first opened, and maybe that stuff got put on hold after 9/11/2001 for security purposes (and later due to the economic downturn), but with the recent uptick in commercial building all around the city (and across the river), you gotta think that will change before the decade is out.

Go-UML
03-17-2015, 11:22 AM
But I'm surprised it's been close to 20 years now, and they still haven't done anything with the large parcel in front of the TD Garden where the old Garden used to stand. I know they had development plans back when it first opened, and maybe that stuff got put on hold after 9/11/2001 for security purposes (and later due to the economic downturn), but with the recent uptick in commercial building all around the city (and across the river), you gotta think that will change before the decade is out.I think I heard that there's a big proposal going to the Boston Redevelopment Association that is using that parcel. It was two towers but after some community feedback, changed to one. Couldn't immediately find a link to it.

Greg A
03-17-2015, 01:34 PM
[QUOTE=Chuck Murray;6127756 But I'm surprised it's been close to 20 years now, and they still haven't done anything with the large parcel in front of the TD Garden where the old Garden used to stand. I know they had development plans back when it first opened, and maybe that stuff got put on hold after 9/11/2001 for security purposes (and later due to the economic downturn), but with the recent uptick in commercial building all around the city (and across the river), you gotta think that will change before the decade is out.[/QUOTE]

The new Garden opened in 1994. In that 20+ years the Jacobs family has done jack to spruce up the area. Contrast the state of Causeway Street, which could be a great boulevard with great choices for food and drink, with the area around Fenway Park. Now some say that John Henry et al have overrun the area but the expansion of business on Brookline Ave., Boylston St., and Lansdowne St. since Henry took over in 2002 (that's 13 years) is nothing short of amazing. The Fens used to be dark and dingy just like the area around the Garden, full of old warehouses, cheap bars, gas stations and parking lots. Causeway and the general Garden area is still rundown. If you stand at the Flying Bobby statue and look across the street, you can tell how dingy the area still is. Taking down the elevated should have been a catalyst for immediate improvements, with the major landowner in the area, Jeremy Jacobs, taking the lead.Now, like Henry, he couldn't and wouldn't want to do alone, but he could have and should have been a major investor. And as far as the nothing area in front of the new Garden, he's owned that since he bought the old Garden in the '70's. Frankly he should be embarrassed that he's done nothing with the parcel until now. Jacobs has always had the reputation as a cheap owner (only the salary cap era has saved the Bruins) and nothing says it more than the conditions around his neighborhood. Once a hot dog salesman, always a hot dog salesman.

e.cat
03-17-2015, 01:57 PM
I hear you! Although the Downeaster (my sister who lives in Dover takes it into Cambridge frequently) is MUCH more reliable than the MBTA / MBRC / Keolis excuse for a "train." So that's less of a risk. Not having the AC is bad enough, but the past year they have been not on schedule and frequently breaking down. Plus, they are so overcrowded now that people are standing in the aisles more than you would imagine. Not fun!!! But it IS a good point about Wellington. The first game may be 0-0 in the 5th OT. Ha ha :)

The T's a mess, the train is going to leave the station without me if games go into OT. I'm so confused!!! Actually, I like JB's solution. I'm going to head to Wellington and take my chances with that after rethinking the OT possibilities. Tell Eichel to take it easy on us will ya?;):)

chickod
03-17-2015, 03:23 PM
Tell Eichel to take it easy on us will ya?;):)

Let me think....nah :)

Chuck Murray
03-17-2015, 05:07 PM
The new Garden opened in 1994. In that 20+ years the Jacobs family has done jack to spruce up the area. Contrast the state of Causeway Street, which could be a great boulevard with great choices for food and drink, with the area around Fenway Park. Now some say that John Henry et al have overrun the area but the expansion of business on Brookline Ave., Boylston St., and Lansdowne St. since Henry took over in 2002 (that's 13 years) is nothing short of amazing. The Fens used to be dark and dingy just like the area around the Garden, full of old warehouses, cheap bars, gas stations and parking lots. Causeway and the general Garden area is still rundown. If you stand at the Flying Bobby statue and look across the street, you can tell how dingy the area still is. Taking down the elevated should have been a catalyst for immediate improvements, with the major landowner in the area, Jeremy Jacobs, taking the lead. Now, like Henry, he couldn't and wouldn't want to do alone, but he could have and should have been a major investor. And as far as the nothing area in front of the new Garden, he's owned that since he bought the old Garden in the '70's. Frankly he should be embarrassed that he's done nothing with the parcel until now. Jacobs has always had the reputation as a cheap owner (only the salary cap era has saved the Bruins) and nothing says it more than the conditions around his neighborhood. Once a hot dog salesman, always a hot dog salesman.

Agreed. There's so much development going on now (and on the books in the near future) all around the extended West End neighborhood, but within a tight radius of the Jacobs' landmark property ... nothing.

Heck, there's more development going on right now in downtown Durham than around the Garden.

Greg A
03-17-2015, 08:06 PM
Agreed. There's so much development going on now (and on the books in the near future) all around the extended West End neighborhood, but within a tight radius of the Jacobs' landmark property ... nothing.

Heck, there's more development going on right now in downtown Durham than around the Garden.

Not a big fan of what has transpired in Durham. No thought of the scale of buildings either on Main St., Madbury Rd or the general area. UNH is not unique in this but schools are now headed toward off loading student housing responsibilities to private developers. My daughter lives in Ithaca and the same thing is happening out there, the construction of buildings totally out of character with what made the town attractive in the first place.

Terrier520
03-17-2015, 08:25 PM
Yes...and the BU/Vermont game didn't start until around 11:00 p.m. if I recall. We got smoked and it was almost as if nobody cared (or was awake). Even one of the longtime BU diehards who was sitting in front of me left after the 1st period (although I didn't know at the time that she had cancer and actually passed away shortly after). So, yeah, that definitely justifies your train phobia!!

I think it was a 2-1 final score (maybe 3-1 with an ENG). BU had a 1-0, lead, then UNH scored twice in quick succession -- a Brett Bennett special.

chickod
03-17-2015, 09:50 PM
I think it was a 2-1 final score (maybe 3-1 with an ENG). BU had a 1-0, lead, then UNH scored twice in quick succession -- a Brett Bennett special.

Yes, 3-1. But it was one of those games where you could just feel that they could have played 10 periods and we just weren't going to win...you know what I mean? I remember going to that Beanpot consolation game against Harvard in what, 2010? The game against UVM was as dead of an atmosphere as that. Plus, everyone was either emotionally drained from that wild BC/UNH or ready to fall asleep (in fact, there were people in the stands with young children that WERE asleep). Just a dreadful night. So, yes, I can understand those who prefer the first game for that reason. I'm just saying that if your team plays first and loses, then it's not a very fun night for the 2nd game.

Snively65
03-18-2015, 07:26 AM
The new Garden opened in 1994. In that 20+ years the Jacobs family has done jack to spruce up the area. Contrast the state of Causeway Street, which could be a great boulevard with great choices for food and drink, with the area around Fenway Park. Now some say that John Henry et al have overrun the area but the expansion of business on Brookline Ave., Boylston St., and Lansdowne St. since Henry took over in 2002 (that's 13 years) is nothing short of amazing. The Fens used to be dark and dingy just like the area around the Garden, full of old warehouses, cheap bars, gas stations and parking lots. Causeway and the general Garden area is still rundown. If you stand at the Flying Bobby statue and look across the street, you can tell how dingy the area still is. Taking down the elevated should have been a catalyst for immediate improvements, with the major landowner in the area, Jeremy Jacobs, taking the lead.Now, like Henry, he couldn't and wouldn't want to do alone, but he could have and should have been a major investor. And as far as the nothing area in front of the new Garden, he's owned that since he bought the old Garden in the '70's. Frankly he should be embarrassed that he's done nothing with the parcel until now. Jacobs has always had the reputation as a cheap owner (only the salary cap era has saved the Bruins) and nothing says it more than the conditions around his neighborhood. Once a hot dog salesman, always a hot dog salesman.

At least in part a consequence of out-of-town ownership, I think.

Greg A
03-18-2015, 09:36 AM
At least in part a consequence of out-of-town ownership, I think.

John Henry and Tom Werner were out of towners as well, Werner still is. But when they bought the Sox they looked for ways to maximize their investment beyond the product on the field. In the 13 years they have owned the team, the park and the area surrounding Fenway has improved dramatically. On the other hand, Jacobs bought the Garden and the Bruins in, I think, 1975. In the almost 20 years after that he did little to improve the Garden let alone the general area surrounding it. I had season tickets to the Celtics from 1981-1993 and I can give you countless examples of what a dump the place was. When Jacobs finally decided to build the new Garden (a vanilla arena if there ever was one), he not only did not encourage development in the Causeway St. area in general, but he did nothing to develop the huge parcel of land where the old Garden was. The man had and has zero vision.

Anecdotally, I have one memory of Jacobs that gives you the measure of the man. At the speech making before the Bruins parade in 2011 he got up on the podium and, after giving Cam Neely for some unknown reason a gratuitous shot on how he never won a Cup (thanks, btw, to Jacobs' parsimonious ways), he proceeded to talk about the advice he got from the other Boston owners in advance of the parade. Except that, save Kraft, he couldn't remember the names of these owners, including Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck who is the major tenant in his building. Like I said, once a hot dog salesman, always a hot dog salesman. Hopefully his son Charlie, who whiffed the first time he was put out in public, will be do a better job.

Darius
03-18-2015, 09:39 AM
John Henry and Tom Werner were out of towners as well, Werner still is. But when they bought the Sox they looked for ways to maximize their investment beyond the product on the field. In the 13 years they have owned the team, the park and the area surrounding Fenway has improved dramatically. On the other hand, Jacobs bought the Garden and the Bruins in, I think, 1975. In the almost 20 years after that he did little to improve the Garden let alone the general area surrounding it. I had season tickets to the Celtics from 1981-1993 and I can give you countless examples of what a dump the place was. When Jacobs finally decided to build the new Garden (a vanilla arena if there ever was one), he not only did not encourage development in the Causeway St. area in general, but he did nothing to develop the huge parcel of land where the old Garden was. The man had and has zero vision.

Anecdotally, I have one memory of Jacobs that gives you the measure of the man. At the speech making before the Bruins parade in 2011 he got up on the podium and, after giving Cam Neely for some unknown reason a gratuitous shot on how he never won a Cup (thanks, btw, to Jacobs' parsimonious ways), he proceeded to talk about the advice he got from the other Boston owners in advance of the parade. Except that, save Kraft, he couldn't remember the names of these owners, including Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck who is the major tenant in his building. Like I said, once a hot dog salesman, always a hot dog salesman. Hopefully his son Charlie, who whiffed the first time he was put out in public, will be do a better job.but it was OUR dump!

ClOuD 9
03-18-2015, 10:09 AM
Having watched most of the year online and TV, the stands never were more than 2/3 full but a couple of times....tickets could be had for $11....we're talking UNH hockey here! So well done Umi, Scott, and Stewy!! Enjoy the journey.....
They might have had a ticket deal here or there, but don't think tickets have been consistently available at $11 (?)
I've made 7 home games this season, which is the least # for me since the 2000 season. Part of the reason is that I have trouble justifying spending ~$20 a ticket when we're struggling when I was paying almost the same when we were regularly contending for a national championship. The other part is 'get off my lawn you d@mn kids', I just worked all day and I'm tired - much easier to flip on WBIN.

Greg A
03-18-2015, 11:26 AM
but it was OUR dump!

Agree that there is nothing like the sight lines if you were sitting first row of the balcony in the corners. It was the ultimate hockey viewing seat. But everything else about the place reeked of the '50's - cigarette smoke all over the place, guys puking in the mens room, fights up in the third balcony. It could be a rough place to be, especially on fight night (Thursday, in the stands) at Bruins games. I'll tell one story. When I had Celtics tickets, there was a loud speaker right above were our seats were. Early in one of the seasons the sound coming out of it was completely distorted and loud. One of my seatmates stuffed some newspaper in the speaker to blunt the sound. And there it stayed for the entire season.

Snively65
03-18-2015, 12:03 PM
John Henry and Tom Werner were out of towners as well, Werner still is. But when they bought the Sox they looked for ways to maximize their investment beyond the product on the field. In the 13 years they have owned the team, the park and the area surrounding Fenway has improved dramatically. On the other hand, Jacobs bought the Garden and the Bruins in, I think, 1975. In the almost 20 years after that he did little to improve the Garden let alone the general area surrounding it. I had season tickets to the Celtics from 1981-1993 and I can give you countless examples of what a dump the place was. When Jacobs finally decided to build the new Garden (a vanilla arena if there ever was one), he not only did not encourage development in the Causeway St. area in general, but he did nothing to develop the huge parcel of land where the old Garden was. The man had and has zero vision.

Anecdotally, I have one memory of Jacobs that gives you the measure of the man. At the speech making before the Bruins parade in 2011 he got up on the podium and, after giving Cam Neely for some unknown reason a gratuitous shot on how he never won a Cup (thanks, btw, to Jacobs' parsimonious ways), he proceeded to talk about the advice he got from the other Boston owners in advance of the parade. Except that, save Kraft, he couldn't remember the names of these owners, including Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck who is the major tenant in his building. Like I said, once a hot dog salesman, always a hot dog salesman. Hopefully his son Charlie, who whiffed the first time he was put out in public, will be do a better job.

I do not disagree about Jeremy Jacobs always being a hotdog salesman (I think that is where the majority of profits lie in all of these sports facilities), but John Henry is the majority owner of the Red Sox by a huge margin (maybe not quite 50%, but close?), and in 2006 spent millions rebuilding a mansion in Boston (I am assuming that he lives there at least some of the time).

Aerman
03-18-2015, 12:47 PM
Not a big fan of what has transpired in Durham. No thought of the scale of buildings either on Main St., Madbury Rd or the general area.

+2

Of course, you could argue UNH started it with The Mills. Rumor has it a wrecking ball is finally headed for the lower quad. Afraid to see what kind of monstrosity they put there.

Snively65
03-18-2015, 01:15 PM
Okay. Got my tix. Club 37, row B, seats 14 & 15.

For those who don't know, you can call the Whitt at 603-862-4000 for tix!

Snooze, I lose; tickets from the Whitt are sold out.

So, I picked up a ticket for seat 14, row 17, Loge 12. I will try to arrive in time for part of the UVM-UML game, and buy Jeremy Jacobs' hot dogs for supper (just kidding, I am a vegetarian). We can keep in touch via electronic devices about mid-period rendezvous.

Darius
03-18-2015, 02:03 PM
Agree that there is nothing like the sight lines if you were sitting first row of the balcony in the corners. It was the ultimate hockey viewing seat. But everything else about the place reeked of the '50's - cigarette smoke all over the place, guys puking in the mens room, fights up in the third balcony. It could be a rough place to be, especially on fight night (Thursday, in the stands) at Bruins games. I'll tell one story. When I had Celtics tickets, there was a loud speaker right above were our seats were. Early in one of the seasons the sound coming out of it was completely distorted and loud. One of my seatmates stuffed some newspaper in the speaker to blunt the sound. And there it stayed for the entire season.Here's another. I had C's tix at the same time. The row behind us had 3 - 4 seats, room for an additional 1 or 2. A SRO season ticket holder found (smuggled?) a folding chair, set it up and sat behind us. After each game he folded the chair and placed it on top of the (definitely not AC) duct just behind him. He did this for years.

I have many great sport and concert memories in that building. People sneaking in fire doors, different stair configurations in each of the four building corners, fights in the stands/ice/court, bringing towels to 90 plus degree playoff games. It was literally a rat (one brushed my foot) infested crap hole, but I'd take it back in a heart beat. One had to be a FAN to be in the building and opposing teams loathed playing there.

wildcatdc
03-18-2015, 03:51 PM
I hope the HEA all-rookie selections motivate a couple of our frosh just that little bit extra this weekend. (Not that they need it!!)