PDA

View Full Version : NCAA Women's Ice Hockey Records



Sean Pickett
02-28-2015, 06:50 PM
Over in the NCAA Women’s DI Hockey Longest Games (http://board.uscho.com/showthread.php?99831-NCAA-Women%92s-DI-Hockey-Longest-Games) thread dave1318 posted:

Was just wondering, which game holds the record for combined shots on goal? Am I right in thinking it's Harvard-Mercyhurst with 143 (83-60 Harvard)?

I just thought of this because I was reading about the 4 OT BU-SLU 2000 game when the shots were 80-74. I assume that 154 is the men's record.When I read it today I realized that the NCAA doesn't have any compiled records for women's ice hockey that I can find like they do for men. I'm thinking of compiling stats for women's ice hockey, but I would need help. If you have records for your team or teams post them here or email them to me and I will start compiling them. I would start by use the same stats as the NCAA compiled for the 2014-15 Men's Ice Hockey Records (http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/m_icehockey_rb/2015/MIH_DI.pdf), but feel free to suggest additional stats. Furthermore, the men's records only go back to 1947 and if the NCAA started compiling women's records they would likely start at the 2000-01 season, but I want to include all women's records, back to the beginning of varsity hockey.

Sean

ne7minder
02-28-2015, 08:00 PM
If I am not mistaken, OSU and BSU hold the NCAA record for most penalty minutes in a game. I thought they set that record last year but I don't see the stats for it at the moment

OldDave
02-28-2015, 08:25 PM
Here's some records for Women's hockey: http://www.ncaa.org/championships/statistics/ncaa-womens-ice-hockey-records-books The earlier documents are men and women records combined in one.

Sean Pickett
02-28-2015, 09:45 PM
Here's some records for Women's hockey: http://www.ncaa.org/championships/statistics/ncaa-womens-ice-hockey-records-books The earlier documents are men and women records combined in one.Thanks, I thought they had records, but of course they only start with the 2000-01 season.

Sean

TonyTheTiger20
03-03-2015, 11:14 PM
Thanks, I thought they had records, but of course they only start with the 2000-01 season.

Sean
That was the first year women's hockey was an NCAA sport, no?

dave1381
03-04-2015, 12:54 AM
That was the first year women's hockey was an NCAA sport, no?
Correct, but teams and leagues keep records since their inception and sponsorship, not the NCAAs. You can keep both sets of records. And teams recognized their ECAC titles back to 1984 and national titles from 1998 to 2000.

If you had followed the sport a few years earlier than you did, it would feel somewhat like revisionist history. For example, at Harvard in 2003, they recognized Botterill passing Tammy Shewchuk's career records, not any records based on just 3 NCAA seasons. In 2005, Nicole Corriero was aiming for Vicky Sunohara's record for single season goals from 1991.... So it was then odd to see coverage of Agosta breaking Julie Chu's NCAA career scoring record, as Chu is far from the top in the Harvard record book.

Somewhat contradictory is that the coaching records on that NCAA site include pre-NCAA records—but apparently the players after subject to a different standard.

dave1381
03-04-2015, 01:41 AM
Also, I've thought for a while that USCHO should maintain a list of women's college hockey records based on the longer history, seeing as no one else is going to do it. The idea is to have a record book that's consistent with what each team recognizes as its own records, so you'd be compiling what's in each team's media guides.

The key players who are left out (or under-reported) at the top are Tammy Shewchuk 152-155-307, Gretchen Ulion 189-123-312, and Jennifer Botterill 157-183-340. Providence and UNH I recall also had some players in the high 200s.

Now you can ask whether pre-NCAA numbers have the same legitimacy as post-NCAA numbers. I don't see a huge difference, at least before 1997. The 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 seasons were pretty much the same in terms of the number of teams, conferences, and the size of the national tournament, for example. One question is whether you had more games against teams that would have been D-III before the NCAA classification. But then post 1997 or so, the top ECAC teams were only playing games against what would classify as D-I NCAA teams. Now it is true in the 98-99 season Shewchuk and Botterill piled up some points against an awful Colby team that had been playing up to the D-I level (and competing successful under Halldorson before she left to become Minnesota's first coach), but it's not like you didn't have similarly awful teams in the current era. In the earlier 90s, you did have more games between current ECAC teams and future NESCAC teams that were truly D-III, so in some sense earlier 90s records are more suspect. But it wasn't like teams were counting scoring records against club teams, as far as I recall.

That all said, I don't it's really a debate worth having. You just respect however each individual program has certified its scoring records. And by that standard, Gretchen Ulion is the all-time leading goal scorer in women's college hockey, and Jennifer Botterill is the all-time leader scorer.

ARM
03-04-2015, 07:19 AM
But it wasn't like teams were counting scoring records against club teams, as far as I recall.I've seen a lot of variety in how teams report records overall. For example, when Minnesota played New Hampshire, UNH's all-time series record versus Minnesota didn't match the Gophers' all-time mark against the Wildcats, because UNH counted games against the Minnesota club team.

I agree that there are still weaker teams today, but they are far better than the worst teams when I first started following the sport just prior to the NCAA era. The margin in many of those games was 10 goals early in the second period, and then Minnesota would start to play keep away or cycle in the corner rather than try to score anymore. There were teams and players that could have scored at will far more than is the case today. The worst players on the ice in a game these days are much, much better than back then.

It would be interesting from a historical standpoint, but I think it is very much an apples/oranges comparison.

Sean Pickett
03-05-2015, 09:56 AM
I've seen a lot of variety in how teams report records overall. For example, when Minnesota played New Hampshire, UNH's all-time series record versus Minnesota didn't match the Gophers' all-time mark against the Wildcats, because UNH counted games against the Minnesota club team.

I agree that there are still weaker teams today, but they are far better than the worst teams when I first started following the sport just prior to the NCAA era. The margin in many of those games was 10 goals early in the second period, and then Minnesota would start to play keep away or cycle in the corner rather than try to score anymore. There were teams and players that could have scored at will far more than is the case today. The worst players on the ice in a game these days are much, much better than back then.

It would be interesting from a historical standpoint, but I think it is very much an apples/oranges comparison.I don't buy that argument. The NCAA men's records begin with the start of the men's championship, before there were divisions and many of the records are against what are now DIII teams, Canadian teams and defunct programs.

As for records against club teams, I have the same complaint against UNH regarding their stated record vs BU. Several years ago I sent an email to the then women's hockey SID about it. His reply was basically UNH will not consider the BU club and varsity as separate teams. It would be easy enough to do, but UNH has declined to do so.

I have created what I hope is an accurate list of when each school now playing DI began their varsity program. I would use that for compiling records, but it is likely that schools included stats against club teams at least in the early years.

Sean

ARM
03-05-2015, 05:39 PM
I don't buy that argument.I guess I'm not sure what you are disagreeing with. Is it my contention that the worst teams/players today are improved over what they were around the time of the start of the NCAA era? That the landscape is different than it was then, when a lot of top players weren't even trying to score a sizable percentage of the time? I don't have quantitative data to back that up; it is just what I observed.

If you wish to compile records, as I said, it would be interesting.

Hux
03-07-2015, 01:39 AM
Over in the NCAA Women’s DI Hockey Longest Games (http://board.uscho.com/showthread.php?99831-NCAA-Women%92s-DI-Hockey-Longest-Games) thread dave1318 posted:
When I read it today I realized that the NCAA doesn't have any compiled records for women's ice hockey that I can find like they do for men. I'm thinking of compiling stats for women's ice hockey, but I would need helpi. If you have records for your team or teams post them here or email them to me and I will start compiling them. I would start by use the same stats as the NCAA compiled for the 2014-15 Men's Ice Hockey Records (http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/m_icehockey_rb/2015/MIH_DI.pdf), but feel free to suggest additional stats. Furthermore, the men's records only go back to 1947 and if the NCAA started compiling women's records they would likely start at the 2000-01 season, but I want to include all women's records, back to the beginning of varsity hockey.

Sean

UMass and Notre Dame went 151 plus minutes with 87 & 75 shots last night.