PDA

View Full Version : Conference Tourney Attendance



Pages : 1 2 [3] 4 5

billmich88888
03-25-2013, 11:56 AM
On campus, regular season winner hosts and gets a bye into the final 4

chickod
03-25-2013, 11:58 AM
A league that formed in 1984 had its members still in the old league in 1992? Not to mention, it's pretty impressive that 1992 saw a chance to make the finale for a team that folded in 1978. :rolleyes:

I knew that would be misinterpreted. I didn't say "in 1992." The statement was 1992 and BEFORE. All of the Hockey East teams were in the ECAC was my point. For example, in 1977 it was BU, Cornell, UNH and Clarkson in Boston Garden. The point is, gambling on a particular school to make it (i.e., RPI) is a lot riskier than just having the tournament in a location that is in proximity to several schools. That's why they chose a place like Boston, which has (as I mentioned) 11 New England Schools, any of which can easily get to Boston. Now that Hockey East is in Boston, that obviously eliminates it as a possibility for the ECAC tournament, since you can't have two tournaments in the same building at the same time. In addition, by sheer numbers alone there was almost always a New England team in the tourney, so the attendance was going to be at least decent. I'm not even sure what we're arguing about here. I've been going to games since 1971 so I was at all of those games in that period when the ECAC was a huge league (and the only one in the East) and I don't ever remember a "poor" crowd at the post-season tournament. Remember also that only 2 teams from the East and 2 teams from the West made the National tournament then so the ECAC tourney was a gigantic event.

Osorojo
03-25-2013, 12:02 PM
Put yourself in the shoes of the league's CFO. How do you make MONEY?

How? First, concentrate upon exposure, even if you have to give it away. Second, concentrate upon the most popular venue, even if it offends you. Third, decide beforehand how profits will be divided among teams and leagues, even if your team must suffer.

kdiff77
03-25-2013, 12:03 PM
When half the league is in a certain state, of course it's going to get some deference. ;) It's not like they haven't had the tournament in New England, though; 1992 and before it used to be in Boston. One thing is really true, though: you need to have a hockey tournament in a hockey town. Detroit and Minneapolis are certainly hockey towns. Boston and Rochester can get away with it because of the success that the local teams have enjoyed, but that's not to say they aren't hockey towns. They wanted Albany to be in the same field, but alas, it didn't pan out. RPI/Union's non-conference game saw a reported attendance of around 6000, so it's not like attendance would have suffered regardless of the teams.

I would assume it was held in Boston until 1992 because they had a long-term contract that was signed before (or perhaps shortly after) the HE was formed, but that's just a theory.

Since then, the ECAC has stayed away from New England- perhaps because they realized the old tournament used to do well at the Garden because of the schools who left! I think Albany was the best location in terms of geography, but (from what I heard) it kind of sucked in terms of amenities and stuff to do while in town. LP is probably the best choice, despite its great distance from several of the teams. It's a true hockey town, which, as you said, is important.

Saints#1
03-25-2013, 12:08 PM
Be careful with this, because a lot of the draw for ECAC depends on what teams get in. Albany failed because RPI never made it, and Union only made it in the final year after it was decided that they're moving. When the tourney was in LP, RPI never missed twice in a row, and Clarkson almost always made it, along with Cornell. Of course, the Union rule wasn't in place either, and all eligible teams (i.e. 10 out of 12) only had to win one series to make it to LP, not potentially two. If you want attendance, you really need the heavy hitting travelers to make it. Teams like Cornell, Clarkson, RPI, SLU... Yale maybe if it were in New England, but I still don't see that much of a traveling fan base with them. Not a single one of the big four made it to AC this year, and attendance suffered. The league will always report who received a ticket, not who put a rear in one of the seats or a foot in the standing area.

I really think attendance (as you have stated) will have this problem no matter where it goes. The ECAC of today is not the ECAC of old. The difference being these same attendance numbers we had in Albany were in a much larger arena, which made things appear empty and left a lack of that buzz that a championship round should have. If we get similar attendance figures to what we had in Albany (which I think it will) then the Olympic Center is the better fit.

However, the main reason why Lake Placid won the bid is the community. They make the tournament feel welcome, the buzz in the area and the fans walking the streets wearing team jerseys and the excitement is what the tournament needs. This is especially necessary considering we haven't been able to draw well no matter where we go. We might as well be located in a community that makes us the center of attention for one fun weekend.

With all that being said, you are correct to an extent that the "attendance" figures may fall short. Overall, I am looking forward to this coming year/years and it should an exciting time for ECAC Hockey.

FlagDUDE08
03-25-2013, 12:11 PM
How? First, concentrate upon exposure, even if you have to give it away. Second, concentrate upon the most popular venue, even if it offends you. Third, decide beforehand how profits will be divided among teams and leagues, even if your team must suffer.

You don't make any money by giving stuff away.

MGoBlueHockey
03-25-2013, 12:14 PM
I'm gonna miss the automatic home games the CCHA Playoffs presented. Now it will be road and home rotating. With the B1G Tournament at the X in even years and at the JLA in odd.

chickod
03-25-2013, 12:28 PM
Since then, the ECAC has stayed away from New England- perhaps because they realized the old tournament used to do well at the Garden because of the schools who left!

AND because of Hockey East, which they can't compete against in New England.

I went to Albany in 1999 and 2000 (and this was before the Frozen Four became a REAL big-time event). They had a deal where if you bought tickets for the regionals that year you would automatically get Frozen Four tickets for the next year if you wanted them. I had never been there before, but apparently the problem is that because it's the state capital (and not really a "destination") all of the activity was during the week and the place was deserted on the weekend. There was literally NOTHING to do if you were just in the city, unless you wanted to drive all over creation. Again, you take a place like Boston and you have public transportation (subways, etc) that can get you anywhere. Also, Boston is a densely-populated city but it is smallish in terms of square miles, meaning everything is close and many activities are within walking distance. Those of us who are used to metropolitan areas that are densely populated aren't as used to driving great distances, and when we go to a venue we just sort of "expect" the amenities are going to be there. It's just a function of growing up in a place like New England, where we can go to the city, the beach, the mountains, skiing and a million other things and never have to drive more than an hour to do them. Yes, we're spoiled, but it is what it is.

davyd83
03-25-2013, 12:48 PM
How? First, concentrate upon exposure, even if you have to give it away. Second, concentrate upon the most popular venue, even if it offends you. Third, decide beforehand how profits will be divided among teams and leagues, even if your team must suffer.You can't sell it once you've given it away.

UncleRay
03-25-2013, 12:50 PM
Um, RIT? Niagara is 90 miles away. Canisius (who won it) is 70 miles away...Right, Canisius, who pulled 13,797 versus UND's 11,592. Of course that is total attendance for the year versus average attendance per game. Counting on Canisius fans to fill a restroom, let alone a building, is flawed thinking.

FlagDUDE08
03-25-2013, 12:52 PM
Right, Canisius, who pulled 13,797 versus UND's 11,592. Of course that is total attendance for the year versus average attendance per game. Counting on Canisius fans to fill a restroom, let alone a building, is flawed thinking.

Not to mention, they don't even have their own rink; they rent from Buffalo State College.

RSTuthill
03-25-2013, 01:10 PM
Yeah, that's a great idea too. Now EVERYBODY has to drive six hours.
But at least we can ski during the day:):)

moose97
03-25-2013, 01:11 PM
Right, Canisius, who pulled 13,797 versus UND's 11,592. Of course that is total attendance for the year versus average attendance per game. Counting on Canisius fans to fill a restroom, let alone a building, is flawed thinking.


Not to mention, they don't even have their own rink; they rent from Buffalo State College.

I believe I did mention the issues AHA had with attendance/averages...

chickod
03-25-2013, 01:13 PM
But at least we can ski during the day:):)

True. :)

FlagDUDE08
03-25-2013, 01:14 PM
I believe I did mention the issues AHA had with attendance/averages...

That's what happens when RIT doesn't make it.

moose97
03-25-2013, 01:19 PM
That's what happens when RIT doesn't make it.

And there it is. Just give it to the #1 seed (and give the 1 seed a bye to make sure they actually make the tourney) and call it a day. Even if your home rink "only" holds 1000 fans, at least those 1000 fans give a rip about being there and give any tourney good atmosphere. Honestly, it makes sense even in the ECAC, NCHC, Big 10...

wolverineTrumpet
03-25-2013, 01:44 PM
You don't make any money by giving stuff away.
Oddly enough, in this era lots of companies and people make money giving stuff away. I recently watched an interesting interview about how web comics and bloggers make money. They give their product away, and by having it free are able to build a bigger following. Then make money on merchandise and advertising.

My CCHA tickets weren't "free" but practically were. I paid $6.50 each day. Having spent so little on tickets, I spent more at the rink.

kdiff77
03-25-2013, 01:53 PM
Oddly enough, in this era lots of companies and people make money giving stuff away. I recently watched an interesting interview about how web comics and bloggers make money. They give their product away, and by having it free are able to build a bigger following. Then make money on merchandise and advertising.

My CCHA tickets weren't "free" but practically were. I paid $6.50 each day. Having spent so little on tickets, I spent more at the rink.

$6.50??? :eek: That's awesome. I drove six hours to AC and had to pay $30 each day for what were supposed to be upper deck seats. We moved down because there was no one there.

CLS
03-25-2013, 01:55 PM
Oddly enough, in this era lots of companies and people make money giving stuff away. I recently watched an interesting interview about how web comics and bloggers make money. They give their product away, and by having it free are able to build a bigger following. Then make money on merchandise and advertising.

...Worked pretty well for Google and Facebook.

Rover
03-25-2013, 03:05 PM
Is this a good place to mention that I inexplicably got student discount tickets at the Garden box office even though I got out of grad school 15 years ago? :D Just a young lookin' guy I guess, although the dude behind the counter was wearing glasses...;)