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giwan
06-26-2013, 04:40 PM
How about recaps until we get to the quarter/semi finals then go back to the full game. That way you would have time for your Tax(yawn) class work.

Short recaps at least for this round and see how it goes for next round. They are getting rid of the IRS so your class will be a waste of time. Now if you are interested in that new NSA class well HUSH HUSH

Fighting Sioux 23
06-27-2013, 11:28 AM
Well, here's what the game recaps will look like...enjoy.

#56 – 1990-1991 LSSU Lakers vs. #73 – 2005-2006 BU Terriers

It was another epic matchup in the Top 100 Tournament this afternoon in Hartford, as the 1990-1991 LSSU Lakers squared off against the 2005-2006 BU Terriers at the XL Center. Following a sterling rendition of the National Anthem by Divinyls, thoughts of touching oneself quickly turned to the ice. LSSU Bench Boss Jeff Jackson started All-American Darrin Madeley in net, while BU legend Jack Parker pointed to John Curry to lead the Terriers in goal.

A capacity crowd of 15,635 were on their feet as the WCHA crew dropped the puck. LSSU started quickly in the first period, as Mark Astley zipped a pass through center ice that found a streaking Jim Dowd at the Terrier blue line. Dowd split the defenders and roofed a beautiful wrister over the outstretched glove of Curry with 14:43 left in the opening stanza. LSSU nearly added a second goal moments later when Tim Breslin ripped a slapshot from the near circle that fooled Curry, but rattled off the crossbar to keep the game within a goal for the Terriers. BU took advantage of their luck, and skating 4x4 following matching roughing minors, Bryan Ewing slammed home a rebound from the top of the crease, after Madeley was unable to control a Sean Sullivan bullet from the point. The Terrier goal knotted the score at 1-1 with 8:46 remaining in the first. Neither side was able to take control the rest of the way in the first, but Jason Lawrence took an ill-advised elbowing penalty with just 63 seconds left on the clock to put BU down a man for the remainder of the period.

LSSU jumped on BU early in the second, as Jeff Napierala lit the lamp on the powerplay just 37 seconds into the middle frame. LSSU began to dominate play, and just under three minutes later, Steve Barnes found Kurt Miller on a dot to dot pass, and Miller ripped a one-timer past Curry to give LSSU a 3-1 lead with 16:28 left in the second. Coach Parker called a timeout following the goal, and BU settled down, and started to take over. Midway through the second period, BU had an excellent chance to get within one as the Lakers found themselves down two men after Clayton Beddoes and Doug Weight went to the box within about 45 seconds of each other. Unfortunately for the Terriers, they were unable to score with the 75 seconds of the 5x3 advantage. LSSU would give BU another chance later in the second, as Tim Harris got his stick up high on Peter MacArthur. This time, as the powerplay neared its end, the Terriers’ Chris Higgins won an offensive zone draw to Dan Spang, who fired a slapshot from the point that beat a screened Madeley to put BU back within one. The second period would end with LSSU holding a slim 3-2 advantage.

LSSU once again came out strong to start the period, but John Curry was up to the task, stopping a Laker flurry early in the final period of regulation. However, the Lakers would solve the BU netminder once more with 13:07 left in the third, as Sandy Moger tipped in Tim Harris’ shot from the slot, and once again LSSU held a two goal advantage. Following the goal BU once again turned the tables, and began to take control of the action, but Madeley came up with two tremendous saves midway through the third to keep the Lakers up 4-2. BU continued to mount pressure, and drew a penalty with 7:46 remaining, but LSSU did a masterful job on the PK, only to find themselves down a man again with just 4:38 left. Peter MacArthur nearly put BU within one just seconds into the man advantage, but Darrin Madeley robbed the BU forward with a tremendous glove save. While LSSU managed to kill the penalty, BU continued to put the pressure on, and with 1:20 left in the third, Sandy Moger tripped Brandon Yip, to put the Terriers on the powerplay once again. With an empty net, BU gave it their all, but LSSU’s PK proved too much. With just 24 seconds remaining, Jim Dowd won a battle in the corner, flipped the puck down the ice, and celebrated as the goal light flicked on. The empty net, shorthanded goal gave LSSU a 5-2 lead, and that would be all they would need. BU tried to attack in the waning seconds, but when the final horn sounded, the scoreboard read: LSSU 5 – 2 BU.

The Lakers will advance to the second round where they will square off against the #9 1961-1962 Michigan Tech Huskies squad in a classic Yooper Battle. Final shots on goal in the game were BU with 29, and LSSU with 23. First Star: Jim Dowd (2g-0a-2p). Second Star: Darrin Madeley (27 sv, 93.1 sv%). Third Star: Mark Astley (0g-2a-2p).

FreshFish
06-27-2013, 11:46 AM
Thanks!

Much appreciated.

If you are able to get one of those done each weekday between now and labor day (if, I said, if....) then by Labor Day we'd be about 1/4 - 1/3 of the way through what is labeled as the round of 32, it looks like, if I did my math correctly..

22 more to finish the opening round (if this is up-to-date: http://www.collegehockeyweekly.com/Top-100-Tournament-2013.html)


Also, it looks like the bracket might be mislabeled in the top row? where it says "elite 8" actually has 8 games while in common parlance it usually means 8 teams; sweet 16 usually means 16 teams but the top-row label has it at 16 games (you'll see that the top row label has "champion" twice, once for each side of the bracket).

Biddco
06-27-2013, 11:59 AM
This list is bull**** without the tradition modifier. And everyone knows it

Fighting Sioux 23
06-30-2013, 10:40 AM
Thanks!

Much appreciated.

If you are able to get one of those done each weekday between now and labor day (if, I said, if....) then by Labor Day we'd be about 1/4 - 1/3 of the way through what is labeled as the round of 32, it looks like, if I did my math correctly..

22 more to finish the opening round (if this is up-to-date: http://www.collegehockeyweekly.com/Top-100-Tournament-2013.html)

I'm not sure if I'll be able to get 5/week done, but hopefully I can. I'm away on vacation currently, so I don't know how many will be posted in the next week or so, but I hope to get back to getting at least a couple done when I get back.


Also, it looks like the bracket might be mislabeled in the top row? where it says "elite 8" actually has 8 games while in common parlance it usually means 8 teams; sweet 16 usually means 16 teams but the top-row label has it at 16 games (you'll see that the top row label has "champion" twice, once for each side of the bracket).

It looks fine on my end. The Elite 8 has 4 teams on each side (8 total teams), same with sweet 16, round of 32. Also, I have "Championship" on each side, as that is when we're down to the two teams that will play in the championship...one from the left side of the bracket, and one from the right side. It looks fine on IE, Chrome, Firefox, and Safari, but I know people have had issues with the formatting when using Linux.

Fighting Sioux 23
08-02-2013, 09:40 AM
#29 - 1959-1960 Denver vs. #100 - 2002-2003 New Hampshire
August 2, 2013
Bradley Center, Milwaukee, WI
First Round - Midwest Regional

The Top 100 Tournament got back into action once more this morning, as the 1959-1960 Denver Pioneers took on the 2002-2003 New Hampshire Wildcats at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Mark Dinning treated the raucous capacity crowd to a beautiful rendition of the Star Spangled Banner, and the game was about to begin.

Denver controlled play early on, and following a tripping call on Joshua Prudden, Grant Munro fired a slapshot that beat Wildcat Goalie Mike Ayers high to the blocker side for a powerplay goal to give Denver a 1-0 lead. Sean Collins nearly evened up the score, but Pioneer netminder George Kirkwood made a tremendous glove save to keep the Denver up by a goal. Just over halfway through the opening frame, Denver struck again. This time, Bill Masterton fed a beautiful cross ice pass over to Jerry Walker, who fired a one-timer over Ayers’ glove, and Denver was up 2-0. However, that lead would not last for long. Just 37 seconds after the Walker goal, Denver’s Al Barnhill was called for a five minute major for checking from behind, as Barnhill leveled Patrick Foley into the side boards in front of the penalty box. The Wildcats took advantage of the extended powerplay. Just thirty seconds into it, Lanny Gare found Colin Hemingway at the side of the net, and Hemingway hammered the puck home to get New Hampshire back to within one. Just under a minute later, Collins made a tremendous play along the far boards to get to the slot and roofed a wrister to tie the game at two. Finally, as the major wound down, Garrett Stafford unleashed a slap shot from the point that deflected off a Denver Defenseman, and found the back of the net. All of a sudden, New Hampshire was up 3-2, and the first period would end with a Wildcat one-goal lead.

The second period began with New Hampshire piling on the pressure, but Kirkwood kept the Pioneers in the game with several impressive saves, including a beautiful kick save on a 2x1 break. Just after the six minute mark of the second, Denver finally got their first shot on goal of the period, but Ayers was up to the task. Throughout the middle of the middle frame, both sides played tremendous defense, and neither side was able to make much happen in the offensive zone, as the lone shot between the six minute mark and the twelve minute mark was a long wrister from the point by Jim Abbott that Kirkwood easily blocked aside. However, the log jam in the neutral zone would finally be broken when Tim Horst was called for an elbowing penalty with just over 7 minutes left to go in the second period. The Pioneers quickly capitalized, as Jerry Walker scored his second goal of the game just 9 seconds after the penalty. The goal knotted things up at 3, and Denver finally regained momentum. The Pioneers had a few quality chances in the final minutes of the second, but Ayers was up to task. After two periods in Milwaukee, the Pioneers and Wildcats were all square at 3 apiece.

The third stanza opened with a tremendous shift from Denver’s top line, as Masterton nearly put the Pios ahead, but his wrister from about 15 feet rang off the crossbar, and fell harmlessly into the net behind the goal. The two sides then proceeded to play a somewhat boring game in the neutral zone, as neither side was willing to give an inch. Finally, nearly halfway through the period, George Konik made a tremendous individual effort. Konik stole the puck from the Wildcat blueliner in the neutral zone, skated up the near boards, behind the net, and then fed a beautiful pass through the crease to find a streaking John MacMillan at the near post. MacMillan slammed the puck into the back of the net, and the Pioneers took a 4-3 lead. The Wildcats were stunned, and just moments after the puck was dropped to start the game again, Jerry Walker completed his hat trick on a wicked wrister from the near circle that Ayers could not reach. The Pios were up 5-3, and New Hampshire was in a daze. Coach Dick Umile took his timeout, but it would not work. Denver played tremendous defense, cancelling out any Wildcat attack into the DU zone. As the clock wore down, Umile pulled Ayers for the extra attacker, but it proved fruitless. When the final horn sounded, the Denver Pioneers were victorious by the score of 5-3. The win moved Denver through to the Second Round in the Midwest Regional, where the Pioneers will take on the winner of the 1989-1990 Wisconsin – 1973-1974 Michigan Tech matchup.

Fighting Sioux 23
08-02-2013, 11:27 AM
#31 - 1996-1997 North Dakota vs. #98 - 1995-1996 Boston University
August 2, 2013
Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Uniondale, NY
First Round – East Regional

The next Top 100 matchup out of the East Regional pitted the 1996-1997 North Dakota Fighting Sioux against the 1995-1996 Boston University Terriers. Two coaching legends met during warmups, as Dean Blais and Jack Parker shook hands and had a friendly conversation before getting back to business. As the crowd filled with green and red, the Nassau Coliseum began to look more and more like a Christmas tree. The crowd burst into excitement when Sublime came out to sing the National Anthem, and gave a…well...sublime performance. As the officials and players took the ice to get the game underway, one could cut the tension with a knife.

The First Period began with a bang, as Mike Grier leveled Jason Blake along the near boards. Unfortunately for Grier, he was called for a two minute boarding penalty, while Blake was sent to the locker room with an undisclosed injury. The Sioux were unable to cash in on the man advantage, but were able to take the early momentum. Just after the six minute mark of the first, Curtis Murphy let an innocent wrister fly from the point that Terrier goalie Tom Noble fought off with his blocker, but the rebound landed on Kevin Hoogsteen’s stick, and he flipped a wrister on net that beat Noble blocker side. The goal gave North Dakota a 1-0 lead, but it would be short lived. Just 19 seconds after the Sioux goal, Terrier forward Chris Drury found Jay Pandolfo on a cross-ice feed that Pandolfo roofed over the sprawling Aaron Schweitzer to knot the game at one. While each team would get a powerplay opportunity, neither was able to convert, and the first period ended 1-1.

The middle frame would be another tight battle, as each team played a physical, yet fast form of hockey. Unfortunately for the forwards in green and red, the blueliners and goalies were the show in the second. Early in the period, Schweitzer made a beautiful save on Brendan Walsh, flashing the glove to stop a wrister labeled for the top shelf. Midway through, David Hoogsteen had a clean break from just outside the blue line, but Noble was not fooled, and made a great kick save after Hoogsteen attempted a forehand to backhand deke. With just under five minutes left to play, Chris Drury once again wreaked havoc in the offensive zone. Drury won a chase to the puck in the corner, and found Chris O’Sullivan at the point. O’Sullivan launched a slap shot that beat Schweitzer, but hit the near post. The second period ended with neither side adding to the scoreboard, and the two squads entered the third tied at 1.

The Third Period began in a similar fashion as the second ended, with neither side able to mount many scoring chances. However, with 12 minutes left on the clock, Jason Blake made his way back to the Sioux bench. The Forward quickly proved his worth, as on his first shift after coming back the crafty Sophomore won control of the puck in the neutral zone, skated in along the far boards, cut to the slot before sliding a backhand pass to Jay Panzer at the bottom of the far circle, who fired a one-timer past the diving Noble to give North Dakota a 2-1 lead. The goal sent the Sioux fans in attendance in a craze, and North Dakota would ride the momentum to another goal just 41 seconds later, as Adam Calder ripped a wrist shot from the slot that beat Noble glove side. The goal put North Dakota up 3-1 and in the driver’s seat. BU coach Jack Parker called a timeout, and that seemed to focus his side on mounting a comeback. With just under 7 minutes left in the third, BU struck back, as Doug Wood let a wrister fly from the point, that Bob Lachance managed to deflect past Schweitzer. North Dakota was up in arms claiming that Lachance hit the puck with a high stick, but after a quick review, the officials pointed to the center dot, putting BU back to within 1. The Terriers continued to mount pressure, but strong defense from the Sioux and timely goaltending from Schweitzer kept North Dakota up by the slimmest of margins. Finally, with just over 90 seconds left, Parker called for Noble to come off the ice for the extra attacker. North Dakota nearly deposited the puck into the empty net, but Chris Drury made a tremendous diving effort to swipe the puck just off course, and kept the Terriers in the game. With time winding down, Jay Pandolfo made a tremendous play to win the puck behind the Sioux net. Pandolfo then found extra attacker Shawn Bates streaking down the slot, and Bates wasted no time in getting the puck to his backhand and roofing it over Schweitzer to tie the game at 3 with just 7.9 seconds left on the clock. The Terrier fans went nuts, and the Sioux were stunned. The third period ended 3-3, and overtime was next.

The tension continued to mount as the Zambonis cleared the ice for the extra period. When the puck dropped, almost everyone in the sold out crowd was sitting on pins and needles, but it would not take long for a winner to be determined. Just two and a half minutes into the extra period, Jason Blake stole a pass in the neutral zone, and came in with David Hoogsteen on a 2x0. Blake sent a pass over to Hoogsteen near the far circle, and Hoogsteen completed the give and go with another perfect pass over to Blake at the near post. All Blake had to do was get a stick on the puck, and he did, sending the puck into the net and sending North Dakota on to the Second Round where they will take on the winner of the 1993-1994 Boston University – 1965-1966 Clarkson matchup. The final score from Uniondale, North Dakota 4, Boston University 3.

Fighting Sioux 23
08-04-2013, 09:29 AM
#33 - 1967-1968 Cornell vs. #96 - 1972-1973 Denver
August 3, 2013
Verizon Wireless Arena, Manchester, NH
First Round – Northeast Regional

Last night, the 1967-1968 Cornell Big Red squared off against the 1972-1973 Denver Pioneers in the First Round of the Northeast Regional in the Top 100 Tournament. As fans clad in different shades of red filled the sold out arena, John Fred and His Playboy Band took to the ice to sing the National Anthem. Following their sterling rendition, the crowd was electric, and Ned Harkness and Murray Armstrong gave their respective teams a quick word of wisdom before they took to center ice for the opening draw.

The First period was a goaltending exhibition, as Cornell’s Ken Dryden and Denver’s Ron Grahame stopped everything they saw. The first big save was by the Big Red netminder, when Denver’s Rob Palmer and Rick Bragnalo came in on a 2x1. A crisp cross-ice pass from Palmer to Bragnalo left the Pioneer center all alone with Dryden, but Bragnalo’s wrister glanced off Dryden’s outstretched blocker, and the game remained scoreless just four minutes into the action. Peter McNab gave Denver another great scoring chance midway through the period, as the Pioneer forward beat the Cornell blueliners to a puck behind the net, skated out into the crease, and tried to beat Dryden five hole, but Dryden was too quick, and got his stick on the puck to keep zeroes on the board. Cornell had their first great chance with just under 7 minutes remaining in the period, as Robert McGuinn won an offensive zone draw back to Bruce Pattison. Pattison fired a wrister from the point, but it deflected off a Denver forward right onto the stick of Garth Ryan. Ryan had a near wide open net to shoot at, and fired a wrist shot for what appeared to be an easy goal. Unfortunately for Cornell, Ron Grahame made a tremendous blocker save, sending the puck up and over the glass behind the net. The rest of the first saw both goalies make relatively ordinary saves, and the first period ended where it started, tied at zero.

The second stanza began where the first period ended, as both goalies continued to dominate the game, making stop after stop. Finally, with just 9 minutes remaining in the game, Cornell struck first blood, as Dan Lodboa won a neutral ice battle for the puck along the far boards, skated into the offensive zone, behind the net, and found Brian Cornell storming into the slot. Lodboa lifted a perfect saucer pass to Cornell, who corralled the puck, deked to the backhand before turning to the forehand and rifling a wrister past Grahame’s outstretched glove. The goal gave Cornell a 1-0 lead, and they would take that lead to the second, as Cornell’s blueline stopped almost every Pioneer chance in the period, and what few pucks found their way in on net, were easily kept out by Dryden.

The final frame proved to be a classic, as neither side was willing to give an inch. Despite getting back to back powerplays in the first third of the period, Denver was unable to muster a shot on goal, thanks in large part to Cornell’s suffocating defense. Finally, as the scoreboard drew down to just under 10 minutes to go, Denver’s Jim Miller dumped the puck into the offensive zone. An odd carom off the glass saw the puck kick into the slot, fooling the Big Red defensemen. Ed Hays found himself all alone, and quickly put a wrister on net from about 20 feet. The shot beat Dryden glove side, and the Pioneers had tied the game. Following the goal, both sides trenched in further, and possession in the offensive zone was non-existent. The turning point proved to be when Cornell’s William Mackay took a boarding penalty with just under four minutes left. The Pioneers were unable to muster anything with the man advantage, and the Big Red killed the penalty, and the Cornell crowd went bananas, giving the Ivy League school a tremendous lift. The Big Red stormed the crease in the final 100 seconds, and finally broke through with just 41 ticks left on the clock, as Steve Giuliani found a rebound lying at the side of the net, and hammered the puck home to give Cornell the 2-1 advantage. Coach Armstrong called his timeout following the goal, and the Pioneers pushed with the extra attacker to try and knot the game at two. However, Dryden would prove to be too much, making a tremendous glove save on Brad Carefoot with just 9 seconds left. Cornell would win the ensuing draw, dump the puck back to the Denver zone. The final horn sounded moments later, and Cornell earned a tough 2-1 victory over Denver to advance to the Second Round to take on the winner of the 1948-1949 BC – 1953-1954 Minnesota contest.

Fighting Sioux 23
08-08-2013, 09:48 AM
#34 - 1993-1994 Boston University vs. #95 - 1965-1966 Clarkson
August 8, 2013
Verizon Center, Washington, D.C.
First Round – East Regional

Action resumed in the First Round at the East Regional today, as the 1993-1994 BU Terriers took on the 1965-1966 Clarkson Golden Knights at the Verizon Center in our nation’s capital. The Crash Test Dummies got the sold out stadium rocking with a sterling rendition of the National Anthem. Following that, Clarkson bench boss Len Ceglarski shook Terrier coach Jack Parker’s hand, and the stage was set for another great matchup.

The First Period matched the electricity in the crowd, as both sides came out on fire. Clarkson captain Harry Dunn nearly put the Golden Knights up early, as his wrist shot from the near circle fooled Terrier netminder J.P. McKersie, but rang off the crossbar. BU came charging back and with just over 14 minutes remaining in the opening frame, Mike Pomichter found Jacques Joubert in the slot, and Joubert roofed a wrist shot over Terry Yurkiewicz to give the Terriers a 1-0 lead. The Golden Knights struck back midway through the first, when Tom Hurley made a tremendous individual effort, stealing the puck from Chris O’Sullivan in the neutral zone and then used his speed to skate past Rich Brennan at the Terrier blue line. Hurley then let a wrister fly from just below the far circle that beat McKersie and knotted the score at 1. The Golden Knights then struck again following the ensuing faceoff, as Hurley won a battle behind the net for the puck, and found Dunn in the crease. Dunn was able to get just enough of the puck to chip it past McKersie to give Clarkson a 2-1 lead. As the first period was nearing its end, Hurley again provided a spark for the Knights, leveling Jay Pandolfo at center ice. Dunn picked the puck up and fed it forward to Fred Silver at center ice. Silver made a slick toe drag to get past Kaj Linna just inside the Terrier blue line, and then fired a screaming slap shot that beat McKersie glove side. The goal put Clarkson up 3-1 with just 31 seconds left in the opening frame, and that would be the score after one period.

Terrier Coach Jack Parker made a goaltending change, as Derek Herlofsky found himself in between the pipes to start the second. Clarkson immediately tested Herlofsky, but the Junior made a tremendous glove save to rob Hurley from a second goal. The save seemed to change momentum, as the Terriers began to dominate play, but were unable to solve Yurkiewicz. Pandolfo nearly solved the Golden Knight goalie, but Yurkiewicz was able to get his left leg out for a great kick save midway through the second period to keep Clarkson up 3-1. The Terriers then had successive powerplay advantages, but Clarkson’s Gary Patterson and Andy Hamilton teamed up for a tremendous stretch of defensive play, not allowing BU to gain entry into the zone. As the clock ticked down in the second stanza, Patterson made a tremendous pass from his own zone through center ice, finding a streaking Dunn on a 2x1 with Hurley entering into the Terrier zone. Dunn fed a beautiful pass to Hurley who left a great drop pass to Silver in the slot. Silver didn’t waste any time, and roofed a one-timer over Herlofsky’s outstretched glove to put Clarkson up 4-1. The Golden Knights maintained the lead through the final ticks in the second, and they went into the dressing room after 40 minutes with the three goal lead.

With the Terrier faithful hoping for another D.C. miracle, BU came out flying to start the third. The Terrier pressure finally broke Yurkiewicz again just over two minutes into the final stanza when Steve Thornton fed a beautiful cross ice feed to Mike Prendergast at the near circle. Prendergast fired a one-timer that beat Yurkiewicz low to the blocker, and BU was back in the game at 4-2. Just over three minutes later, the Terriers had a tremendous chance to cash in on the man advantage when Andy Hamilton cross checked Jay Pandolfo behind the Golden Knight’s net. However, it would be Clarkson that would take control back when they dominated another penalty kill, and when Hamilton’s penalty ended, Gary Patterson found the defenseman just as he was getting out of the box, sending Hamilton in on a break. Herlofsky made a tremendous stop on Hamilton’s backhander, but Hurley was on the door step with the rebound and hammered it home to put Clarkson back up 3. Coach Parker called his timeout, but it would prove ineffective. Clarkson’s defensive corps dominated the rest of the game, and any chance that BU created was turned aside by Yurkiewicz. The Golden Knight fans rejoiced when the final buzzer sounded, and Clarkson pulled off the upset. The Golden Knights advance to the second round where they will square off against the 1996-1997 North Dakota Fighting Sioux.

Aerman
08-08-2013, 10:23 AM
Is this the first upset? I was starting to be concerned that there would not be any until the rankings got much closer together.

Fighting Sioux 23
08-08-2013, 10:26 AM
Is this the first upset? I was starting to be concerned that there would not be any until the rankings got much closer together.

This is the first "big" upset.

Other "upsets" in the first round:
#65 1981-1982 North Dakota over #64 1990-1991 Maine
#71 1988-1989 Minnesota over #58 2000-2001 Michigan State

giwan
08-08-2013, 12:27 PM
Keep rolling through these and the Sioux should be losing more. Who's up next

Fighting Sioux 23
08-08-2013, 01:58 PM
Keep rolling through these and the Sioux should be losing more. Who's up next

The Sioux will win whenever the generator says they'll win. They'll have to lose at least once in the next round...as they play each other in one matchup. :p:D:D

Next matchup will be '89-90 Wisconsin against '73-74 Tech...or at least that is the plan.

Fighting Sioux 23
08-09-2013, 10:09 AM
#36 - 1989-1990 Wisconsin vs. #93 - 1973-1974 Michigan Tech
August 9, 2013
Sprint Center, Kansas City, MO
First Round – Midwest Regional

Action resumed in the Midwest Regional today, as the 1989-1990 Wisconsin Badgers squared off against the 1973-1974 Michigan Tech Huskies. The Sprint Center in Kansas City was the host, and Badger and Husky fans occupied nearly all 17,000+ seats. Both fan bases went ballistic when Biz Markie came out to sing the national anthem, and continued to keep the building full of noise as the puck was set to drop.

The First Period belonged to Wisconsin, as the Badgers struck just 49 seconds into the opening stanza. Mark Osiecki launched a slapshot from the point that Husky goalie Rick Quance got a piece of, but John Byce was on the doorstep, and slammed home the rebound to give Wisconsin the 1-0 lead. The Badgers continued their strong play, and just over five minutes in, the Badgers gained the man advantage when Jim Nahrgang took a hooking penalty along the near boards as Wisconsin was cycling the puck. Bucky wasted little time on the powerplay, as Gary Shuchuk won the ensuing draw back to Barry Richter. Richter then fired a slapshot that beat Quance high to the glove and Wisconsin took a two goal lead. Michigan Tech started to get their feet moving following the Richter goal, but were unable to solve Badger netminder Duane Derksen, as the Sophomore from Manitoba stopped all 9 shots he saw in the first period. Meanwhile, Wisconsin continued their offensive onslaught, hurling 17 shots on Quance in the first. Fortunately for Tech, Quance managed to stop the rest of those following the second goal, and the first period ended with Wisconsin holding a 2-0 advantage.

Michigan Tech barely made it out to the ice in time for the faceoff to start the second period, perhaps a result of being on the wrong end of a stern lecture from coach MacInnes. It seemed to pay dividends though, as Michigan Tech took control of the play from the opening draw. The Huskies finally got on the scoreboard just under four minutes into the period when Mike Zuke made a tremendous individual effort, getting a feed from Bob Lorimer in the neutral zone, and taking the puck right up the middle, splitting the Badger defenders and beating Derksen with a nice wrist shot just under the blocker from the slot. The goal put Tech back within one, but seemed to put a bit of pep back into the Badgers’ skates. Wisconsin responded with a tremendous shift, and Steve Rohlik had a tremendous chance to put the Badgers back up by two. Unfortunately for Rohlik, Quance made a tremendous save, flashing his glove to keep the game 2-1. The Badgers would not relent though, and just a few minutes later, Don Granato found himself on a partial breakaway after Husky defensemen Paul Jensen lost an edge. Granato used his speed to get past Nahrgang, but Nahrgang hauled down Granato. A controversial penalty shot was awarded, and Granato converted, wasting little time in flying down the ice and roofing a wrist shot over Quance to give Wisconsin a 3-1 lead. Coach MacInnes called a timeout to help calm his team down, as they were still quite upset over the penalty shot call. The Huskies responded, and with just 19 ticks left on the clock in the second period, drew back within a goal when Graham Wise received a beautiful cross ice feed from Bill Steele at the near circle and quickly fired a one-timer that beat Derksen high to the glove side. The second period drew to a close with Wisconsin holding a 3-2 lead.

The puck dropped for the third period, and the crowd was on edge, knowing that the game was still up for grabs with just 20 minutes left. The players seemed to sense the tense atmosphere, and the final frame opened with tentative play from both sides. Finally, with just 14 minutes left in the period, Wisconsin took an ill-advised penalty when Tom Sagissor was called for boarding in the neutral zone. Coach Sauer immediately fumed at the refs, but to no avail. Unfortunately for the Huskies though, Wisconsin proved dominant down a man, and killed the penalty before Tech was able to muster a shot on goal. Following the Tech powerplay, the game opened up, and each side had opportunities to put the puck in the net, but it wasn’t until just under 7 minutes left that Wisconsin took control once again, as Joe Decker launched an innocent wrister from the near circle. The puck appeared to be going far wide of the Tech net, but caromed off Bruce Abbey’s skate just outside the crease, and trickled through a surprised Quance’s five hole and into the net. The goal sent the Badger fans in attendance into elation, and gave Wisconsin a 4-2 lead. Despite Tech’s best efforts, the Huskies were unable to solve Derksen, and when Doug Macdonald sent the puck down the ice and into the empty Tech net with just 8 seconds left on the clock, the Tech hopes were gone. When the horn sounded to end the game, Wisconsin led 5-2 on the scoreboard to take the win and advance to the second round where the Badgers will square off against the 1959-1960 Denver Pioneers.

Shirtless Guy
08-12-2013, 07:07 PM
#36 - 1989-1990 Wisconsin vs. #93 - 1973-1974 Michigan Tech
August 9, 2013
Sprint Center, Kansas City, MO
First Round – Midwest Regional

Action resumed in the Midwest Regional today, as the 1989-1990 Wisconsin Badgers squared off against the 1973-1974 Michigan Tech Huskies. The Sprint Center in Kansas City was the host, and Badger and Husky fans occupied nearly all 17,000+ seats. Both fan bases went ballistic when Biz Markie came out to sing the national anthem, and continued to keep the building full of noise as the puck was set to drop.

The First Period belonged to Wisconsin, as the Badgers struck just 49 seconds into the opening stanza. Mark Osiecki launched a slapshot from the point that Husky goalie Rick Quance got a piece of, but John Byce was on the doorstep, and slammed home the rebound to give Wisconsin the 1-0 lead. The Badgers continued their strong play, and just over five minutes in, the Badgers gained the man advantage when Jim Nahrgang took a hooking penalty along the near boards as Wisconsin was cycling the puck. Bucky wasted little time on the powerplay, as Gary Shuchuk won the ensuing draw back to Barry Richter. Richter then fired a slapshot that beat Quance high to the glove and Wisconsin took a two goal lead. Michigan Tech started to get their feet moving following the Richter goal, but were unable to solve Badger netminder Duane Derksen, as the Sophomore from Manitoba stopped all 9 shots he saw in the first period. Meanwhile, Wisconsin continued their offensive onslaught, hurling 17 shots on Quance in the first. Fortunately for Tech, Quance managed to stop the rest of those following the second goal, and the first period ended with Wisconsin holding a 2-0 advantage.

Michigan Tech barely made it out to the ice in time for the faceoff to start the second period, perhaps a result of being on the wrong end of a stern lecture from coach MacInnes. It seemed to pay dividends though, as Michigan Tech took control of the play from the opening draw. The Huskies finally got on the scoreboard just under four minutes into the period when Mike Zuke made a tremendous individual effort, getting a feed from Bob Lorimer in the neutral zone, and taking the puck right up the middle, splitting the Badger defenders and beating Derksen with a nice wrist shot just under the blocker from the slot. The goal put Tech back within one, but seemed to put a bit of pep back into the Badgers’ skates. Wisconsin responded with a tremendous shift, and Steve Rohlik had a tremendous chance to put the Badgers back up by two. Unfortunately for Rohlik, Quance made a tremendous save, flashing his glove to keep the game 2-1. The Badgers would not relent though, and just a few minutes later, Don Granato found himself on a partial breakaway after Husky defensemen Paul Jensen lost an edge. Granato used his speed to get past Nahrgang, but Nahrgang hauled down Granato. A controversial penalty shot was awarded, and Granato converted, wasting little time in flying down the ice and roofing a wrist shot over Quance to give Wisconsin a 3-1 lead. Coach MacInnes called a timeout to help calm his team down, as they were still quite upset over the penalty shot call. The Huskies responded, and with just 19 ticks left on the clock in the second period, drew back within a goal when Graham Wise received a beautiful cross ice feed from Bill Steele at the near circle and quickly fired a one-timer that beat Derksen high to the glove side. The second period drew to a close with Wisconsin holding a 3-2 lead.

The puck dropped for the third period, and the crowd was on edge, knowing that the game was still up for grabs with just 20 minutes left. The players seemed to sense the tense atmosphere, and the final frame opened with tentative play from both sides. Finally, with just 14 minutes left in the period, Wisconsin took an ill-advised penalty when Tom Sagissor was called for boarding in the neutral zone. Coach Sauer immediately fumed at the refs, but to no avail. Unfortunately for the Huskies though, Wisconsin proved dominant down a man, and killed the penalty before Tech was able to muster a shot on goal. Following the Tech powerplay, the game opened up, and each side had opportunities to put the puck in the net, but it wasn’t until just under 7 minutes left that Wisconsin took control once again, as Joe Decker launched an innocent wrister from the near circle. The puck appeared to be going far wide of the Tech net, but caromed off Bruce Abbey’s skate just outside the crease, and trickled through a surprised Quance’s five hole and into the net. The goal sent the Badger fans in attendance into elation, and gave Wisconsin a 4-2 lead. Despite Tech’s best efforts, the Huskies were unable to solve Derksen, and when Doug Macdonald sent the puck down the ice and into the empty Tech net with just 8 seconds left on the clock, the Tech hopes were gone. When the horn sounded to end the game, Wisconsin led 5-2 on the scoreboard to take the win and advance to the second round where the Badgers will square off against the 1959-1960 Denver Pioneers.Sorry but that was just brutal :( To make the clinching goal be an innocent shot redirected by an MTU player? I thought the Huskies of the 70's were way better than that! I've seen enough of those goals in the last decade...don't need to have you doing that to what was one of Tech's best teams ever! :p

Fighting Sioux 23
01-30-2014, 08:38 AM
In an effort to actually get this thread back on track in a realistic manner, I have decided to do what I will call "Quick Summaries" of the remaining first round games next Thursday and Friday. I may do a couple today and tomorrow as well. By my count, there are still 16 games remaining in the First Round.

Following that, my plan will be to do 1 regular summary each Thursday, with occasional extra summaries (most likely either an additional summary on Thursday, or one on Friday), with the goal of trying to get the 2nd round completed by the Frozen Four. Obviously, I'll do my best, but cannot guarantee anything.

Fighting Sioux 23
01-30-2014, 09:04 AM
And here is an example of a "Quick Summary"

#50 - 1982-1983 Minnesota Golden Gophers vs. #79 - 1971-1972 Boston University Terriers
East Regional - First Round
Boston Garden - Boston, MA
January 30, 2014

An epic Top 100 matchup between the '82-83 Minnesota Golden Gophers and '71-72 BU Terriers took place this morning in the Bay State at the legendary Boston Garden. Coach Brad Buetow felt confident in his Gophers, while legend Jack Kelley fired up his Terriers in front of a crowd mixed with different shades of red. The puck dropped following a tremendous rendition of the Star Spangled Banner by Dexys Midnight Runners. Minnesota, led by All-WCHA forward Scott Bjugstad struck first on the powerplay just 6 minutes into the opening period. David Jensen's rocket from the point beat the outstretched glove of BU netminder Dan Brady to put Minnesota up 1-0. The Gophers stretched that to a two goal led just minutes later when Rick Erdall fed a beautiful circle to circle pass to Billy Yon. Yon didn't get everything on the shot, but it was just enough to squeak under Brady's armpit, and the Minnesota fans rejoiced. Minnesota controlled the play throughout the rest of the period, but were unable to gain a three goal advantage in the first twenty minutes of play.

The Terriers came out in the second period ready for a comeback, but were continually stifled by Gopher goalie Frank Pietrangelo. Save after save was made by the Ontario native, including a wonderful glove save to rob BU All-American John Danby on a clean break midway through the period. Minnesota nearly extended the lead with just seconds remaining in the middle frame, but Mike Harrer's bullet from the blue line rang off the cross bar and out of play. Through two periods, Minnesota held a 2-0 advantage.

In the final stanza, the Terriers once again made an aggressive push out of the gate, leading to 5 on 3 advantage with 16 minutes to play following back to back hooking minors from Pat Micheletti and Dave Preuss. BU finally solved Pietrangelo with just seconds remaining on the two man advantage as Toot Cahoon jammed a rebound home after Bob Brown's rocket from the point was stopped. The goal gave BU momentum and put the game back in the balance, with Minnesota holding just a 2-1 advantage. As the clock wore on, BU tried desperately to gain the equalizer, but the Terriers could not solve Pietrangelo. Despite outshooting the Gophers 44-21, when the final buzzer rang, Minnesota advanced to the 2nd round with a 2-1 victory. The '82-83 Gophers will square off against the 1966-1967 Cornell Big Red in the 2nd round.

FreshFish
01-30-2014, 09:15 AM
In an effort to actually get this thread back on track in a realistic manner, I have decided to do what I will call "Quick Summaries" of the remaining first round games next Thursday and Friday.

Any chance you can do the "greatest coaches' fights of all times" as a sideline? ;)

Fighting Sioux 23
01-31-2014, 09:08 AM
#40 - 1984-1985 Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs vs. #89 - 1995-1996 Colorado College Tigers
Northeast Regional - First Round
Matthews Arena - Boston, MA
January 31st, 2014

Another great matchup in the Top 100 Tournament pitted the '84-85 Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs against the '95-96 CC Tigers in the First Round at the Northeast Regional. Duluth Coach Mike Sertich and Tiger Coach Don Lucia were both firing up their squads before the puck drop in front of the lively Matthews Arena crowd. However, the crowd really turned up the radio when Autograph came out to sing the National Anthem. A capacity crowd of just under 5,000 stood on their feet as the Hockey East crew dropped the puck, and the game was underway. Duluth struck first following Colin Schmidt's hooking call on Danny May, and Freshman phenom Brett Hull made the Tigers pay with a blistering one-timer from the top of the near circle that beat Tiger goalie Ryan Bach over the blocker, and the Bulldogs had a 1-0 lead. It would be short lived, as the Tigers came roaring back with tremendous pressure, and just 93 seconds later tied the score at 1 when Darren Clark slammed home a juice rebound past UMD goalie Rick Kosti. Both teams skated an up-tempo style, but were unable to light the lamp any further in the first period. After one, the score was 1-1.

The second period saw more of the same up and down action as the first, and just over 3 minutes into the second the Bulldog fans were able to cheer once again, as Skeeter Moore caught CC blueliner Scott Swanson pinching in, and Moore went off to the races, beating Bach five-hole to put Duluth back up 2-1. The Bulldogs added to their lead just under a minute later when Bill Watson made a tremendous hustle play. Watson dumped the puck into the Tiger end, but instead of changing lines, Watson chased the puck behind the net, beat Tiger d-man Eric Rud to the puck, skated out in front of the net, and roofed a wrister past Bach to put Duluth ahead 3-1. Don Lucia called timeout for the Tigers, and it seemed to work, as CC started getting the momentum back on their side, and finally, with just 16 seconds left in the period, Jay McNeill ripped a wrist shot from the slot that beat Kosti glove side to put CC within 1. When the second buzzer sounded, the score was Duluth up 3-2.

The third period proved to be yet another barn burner, as each side continued their racehorse hockey style. Brett Hull notched his second goal of the game just under 5 minutes into the third with a beautiful tip from about 8 feet out that bounced past Bach to give Duluth a 4-2 lead. The Tigers would not quit though, and with just 7 minutes to pay, CC scored on a 3 on 1, as Jim Johnson lost an edge in the neutral zone. A beautiful tic-tac-toe play led to the goal as Calvin Elfring passed the puck up to Peter Geronazzo, who skated the puck in to the far circle, faked a shot that sent Duluth blueliner Guy Gosselin to the ice, then Geronazzo sent a perfect pass over to Brian Swanson who made a quick deke to the backhand and roofed the puck over a sprawled Kosti. The goal sent the Tiger faithful into an uproar, and CC had all the momentum. They would capitalize on that just 37 seconds later as Chad Remackel scored on a sharp angle shot from below the dot that hit Kosti's shoulder and trickled over and into the net. The goal tied the game at 4, and it seemed destined for overtime. Both teams were slightly cautious as the clock ticked down, but with just 49 seconds left in the game, Jason Gudmundson took a pass from CC teammate Travis Cheyne, and ripped a slapshot that beat Kosti, but rang off the far post. The clanker sent the puck flying over to Tom Herzig who then made a tremendous up ice pass to Bill Watson who raced in on net with just Eric Rud to beat. The Hobey winner made a tremendous toe drag to get the edge on Rud, then left a beautiful drop pass for Herzig, who proceeded to rip a wrist shot that beat Bach over the blocker. Just 41 seconds were left on the clock as the puck bulged the back of the net, and Duluth was back on top 5-4. The Tigers pulled their goalie, but it proved futile, as Hull scored his hat trick into the empty net with just 3 ticks on the clock. When the final buzzer sounded, the Bulldogs were on to the second round with a 6-4 thriller of a win. The '84-85 Duluth squad will take on the 1970-1971 BU Terriers.

buoldtimer
01-31-2014, 12:43 PM
#34 - 1993-1994 Boston University vs. #95 - 1965-1966 Clarkson
August 8, 2013
Verizon Center, Washington, D.C.
First Round – East Regional

Action resumed in the First Round at the East Regional today, as the 1993-1994 BU Terriers took on the 1965-1966 Clarkson Golden Knights at the Verizon Center in our nation’s capital. The Crash Test Dummies got the sold out stadium rocking with a sterling rendition of the National Anthem. Following that, Clarkson bench boss Len Ceglarski shook Terrier coach Jack Parker’s hand, and the stage was set for another great matchup.

The First Period matched the electricity in the crowd, as both sides came out on fire. Clarkson captain Harry Dunn nearly put the Golden Knights up early, as his wrist shot from the near circle fooled Terrier netminder J.P. McKersie, but rang off the crossbar. BU came charging back and with just over 14 minutes remaining in the opening frame, Mike Pomichter found Jacques Joubert in the slot, and Joubert roofed a wrist shot over Terry Yurkiewicz to give the Terriers a 1-0 lead. The Golden Knights struck back midway through the first, when Tom Hurley made a tremendous individual effort, stealing the puck from Kevin O’Sullivan in the neutral zone and then used his speed to skate past Rich Brennan at the Terrier blue line. Hurley then let a wrister fly from just below the far circle that beat McKersie and knotted the score at 1. The Golden Knights then struck again following the ensuing faceoff, as Hurley won a battle behind the net for the puck, and found Dunn in the crease. Dunn was able to get just enough of the puck to chip it past McKersie to give Clarkson a 2-1 lead. As the first period was nearing its end, Hurley again provided a spark for the Knights, leveling Jay Pandolfo at center ice. Dunn picked the puck up and fed it forward to Fred Silver at center ice. Silver made a slick toe drag to get past Kaj Linna just inside the Terrier blue line, and then fired a screaming slap shot that beat McKersie glove side. The goal put Clarkson up 3-1 with just 31 seconds left in the opening frame, and that would be the score after one period.



Well, I appreciate that this is fiction, and it is entertaining, but it's still fairly important to make sure that the rosters are accurate. Kevin O'Sullivan graduated in 1993. He wasn't a member of the 1993-94 Terrier squad.