PDA

View Full Version : Post Grad year



Pages : [1] 2

Blackhawks Rule
08-18-2012, 10:43 AM
Can a player play a post grad. year of hockey, after graduating High School, take College courses, and maintain four years of eligibility for a D3 or D1 institution?

Mountain_Hockey_Dad
08-18-2012, 11:38 AM
I assume you mean post grad from high school. In the JWHL the post grad player must be 19 or younger as of 12/31 of that season. I'm pretty sure they can take college classes, but not more than 11 credits per semester. In order to maintain all future eligibility they can't be considered a full time student. 12 credits or more per semester changes status to full time. Once you become full time, I think you have 5 years to complete your 4 years of eligibility.

Hux
08-18-2012, 12:10 PM
I assume you mean post grad from high school. In the JWHL the post grad player must be 19 or younger as of 12/31 of that season. I'm pretty sure they can take college classes, but not more than 11 credits per semester. In order to maintain all future eligibility they can't be considered a full time student. 12 credits or more per semester changes status to full time. Once you become full time, I think you have 5 years to complete your 4 years of eligibility.

Is it 11 credits? I thought anything more than two classes kicked the clock into gear.

granddaddyscout
08-18-2012, 01:44 PM
I am pretty sure it is based on less than "full time status" whcih would be 11 credits or less during full semesters, but only say 5 credits during the popular 1/2 semesters in the late spring and summer.

Blackhawks Rule
08-18-2012, 04:42 PM
Yes, I meant after playing her four years in High School. Then playing on a U19 team the year after H.S. graduation. She has been getting conflicting information. Thank you for your responses, we are fortunate to be able to use this forum to gather credible information.

ARM
08-18-2012, 05:24 PM
Yes, I meant after playing her four years in High School. Then playing on a U19 team the year after H.S. graduation. She has been getting conflicting information. Thank you for your responses, we are fortunate to be able to use this forum to gather credible information.Don't take anything you read here as gospel fact. If a student athlete's future is riding on the answer, I'd check with the NCAA or the compliance department at a member institution.

OneTimer
08-18-2012, 05:30 PM
Credits earned are very different from time on the ice. Playing eligibility depends on D1 vs D3 and also has more to do with when you become a rostered player. Credits earned before enrollment will matter more to the status of being considered a transfer student vs an incoming freshman. There are ways to play as a grad student.

FlagDUDE08
08-19-2012, 09:47 PM
Can a player play a post grad. year of hockey, after graduating High School, take College courses, and maintain four years of eligibility for a D3 or D1 institution?

I don't see why not. Quebecois typically finish an undergraduate degree in three years because of the design of their schooling, and considering the number of students that take time off for juniors, at least on the male side, why should it be any different for the women?

OnMAA
08-20-2012, 08:29 AM
Can a player play a post grad. year of hockey, after graduating High School, take College courses, and maintain four years of eligibility for a D3 or D1 institution?

There are many, I repeat MANY, rules and factors to determine when the clock starts ticking on eligibility. There are also some exemptions, for example National team members during an Olympic year or armed forces service, that can extend the eligibility duration.

My advice. Read the NCAA rule book thoroughly first, and then work with your target school and or NCAA advisor to discuss the details of your situation, before making any decisions.

OnMAA
08-20-2012, 08:31 AM
I don't see why not. Quebecois typically finish an undergraduate degree in three years because of the design of their schooling, and considering the number of students that take time off for juniors, at least on the male side, why should it be any different for the women?

There are special later "start" rules for NCAA men's hockey. Read the NCAA rule book first.

NoGo
08-20-2012, 11:42 AM
My daughter did this in the 2010-2011 season.

She did this to improve her SAT scores and to get ready to go to college full time. When she started grade 11 we found that she had a reading comprehension issue. She/we also knew around that time if she played college hockey it would be at a D3.

Our situation here in Dallas allowed for her to go a local JUCO and play on a good team. She had moved from defensive to forward her SR year (2009-20010) so another year at forward was good for her. She went to the JUCO and kept her schedule at less than 9 hours a semester to allow her to work on her studies. She took developmental classes in English & Math (which did not count towards her “NCAA clock”) and each semester she also took a PE class. She worked part-time at a local hockey shop and continued to train. This also allowed her to retake her SAT and she added 100 points to her math score (645) and 110 to English (695).

This allowed her to develop at her position and was recruited by four D3, including UMass-Boston. That is the one she wanted and chose. This fall will be her second year there.

Our situation was different and it was “perfect storm” for us. Check out your local situation and see what is available. If you are looking at a D1 situation you need to weigh your options.

Bottom line-
By the time you are 15 or 16 you have a pretty good idea if you are going to be on the National team. You have a pretty good idea if you may play someday for the Women’s Olympic Team. There are very few women playing pro-hockey, and IMHO there is a reason why those girls have to have a “support” job.

Use the hockey to go to college, use the college to get an education and a career.

OneTimer
08-20-2012, 03:50 PM
Can a player play a post grad. year of hockey, after graduating High School, take College courses, and maintain four years of eligibility for a D3 or D1 institution?

Yes - absolutely!

Hockeydad4two
08-20-2012, 07:51 PM
...snip...

Use the hockey to go to college, use the college to get an education and a career.

Many people have said this, but this is the clearest it's been written that I've ever heard. Until there's a pro league for women that pay's a living salary, this is the best advice that a young woman hockey player can take.

OnMAA
08-20-2012, 09:18 PM
Use the hockey to go to college, use the college to get an education and a career.

Your closing sentence clinched it. Great exclamation point to drive the message home.

NoGo
08-21-2012, 12:31 PM
Thanks.

It was hard to develop a team here (in Dallas) and we tried different things. One thing we have had was a consistent coach, access to good facility’s and the handful of folks driving this thing. The folks that stepped in last year after I left have tried some new things themselves and attracted some players. Their efforts have paid off.

Each girl is different and so are their situations, I am a big proponent of the “post grade” year. Especially for girls that are D3 players, those looking to improve their grades, or SAT or ACT scores.

CrossCheck
08-21-2012, 02:48 PM
With 1,340 SAT's she could play anywhere in the nescac.....and she picked Umass-Boston??

NoGo
08-21-2012, 04:51 PM
Wanted to major in nursing...don't know if that will ever happen. But her pick. She has to bust her *** to get the grades there, plus pay wonderful out-of-stae tution too. Took two classes this past summer at the same JUCO.

Call It
08-21-2012, 09:01 PM
With 1,340 SAT's she could play anywhere in the nescac.....and she picked Umass-Boston??

Grades get you to one place and your hockey to another, it seems. Sometimes they are the same place but not here

CrossCheck
08-21-2012, 10:05 PM
The story just seems odd and getting more so. With those scores one would think she would be coasting with all "A's" at that place. Well, good luck.

NoGo
08-23-2012, 12:58 PM
My daughter did this in the 2010-2011 season.

She did this to improve her SAT scores and to get ready to go to college full time. When she started grade 11 we found that she had a reading comprehension issue. She/we also knew around that time if she played college hockey it would be at a D3.

Our situation here in Dallas allowed for her to go a local JUCO and play on a good team. She had moved from defensive to forward her SR year (2009-20010) so another year at forward was good for her. She went to the JUCO and kept her schedule at less than 9 hours a semester to allow her to work on her studies. She took developmental classes in English & Math (which did not count towards her “NCAA clock”) and each semester she also took a PE class. She worked part-time at a local hockey shop and continued to train. This also allowed her to retake her SAT and she added 100 points to her math score (645) and 110 to English (695).

This allowed her to develop at her position and was recruited by four D3, including UMass-Boston. That is the one she wanted and chose. This fall will be her second year there.

Our situation was different and it was “perfect storm” for us. Check out your local situation and see what is available. If you are looking at a D1 situation you need to weigh your options.

Bottom line-
By the time you are 15 or 16 you have a pretty good idea if you are going to be on the National team. You have a pretty good idea if you may play someday for the Women’s Olympic Team. There are very few women playing pro-hockey, and IMHO there is a reason why those girls have to have a “support” job.

Use the hockey to go to college, use the college to get an education and a career.

Did you read this?

Mabe I should have added that her grades were not great? I thought that was clear when I said she she took developmental classes in English & Math, and re-took the SAT. Maybe I should have said that was done 3 times. D1 were recriting here until they saw her GPA & intial SAT scores were not good. We knew there was an issue there and it took the school and a very dedicated counsler to get her tested to learn she had a reading comprehension issue, then work with her the next two years in high school one-on-one.

You were not here for the 3 years that she worked through issue at high school/JUCO and the struggles she went through. You were not here to see her work hard at SAT prep to get the scores up. She will always have the albatross of her high school GPA following her. Sorry UMass-Boson is not MIT.

When the shiny D1 quit following her and the D3 came came she picked the one she wanted to go to. Not too hard to figure out which one she is on their roster.

As i said before each situation is diffrent.