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Osorojo
05-14-2012, 07:10 PM
NHL hockey is marked by protracted scrums along the boards and behind the net. The referee loses sight of the puck for five or ten seconds in a maze of skates, legs, and bodies but allows teams to "play on," if that's what you call such a pushin' and wrasslin' match. This phenomenon has changed defensive and offensive strategies by minimizing speed and skill in favor of brute force. [On the flip side a whistle halts play around the crease if the referee loses sight of the puck for a millisecond or even thinks about blowing his whistle.]
What's this have to do with college hockey? That's my concern. What will it have to do with college hockey? Will this style of refereeing trickle down to college hockey so that drawn out six-man scrums along the boards erode the importance of skating and passing?

Happy
05-14-2012, 08:25 PM
and thats why big ice is naturally superior for quality hockey.

gopheritall
05-14-2012, 11:21 PM
and thats why big ice is naturally superior for quality hockey.Bandy sized ice! Hooray! ;)

I prefer the large ice too but...since so many college players are planning (or hoping) on playing in the NHL I reluctantly accept that ice size and many NHL rules will be pushed down to college. That includes the inevitable shoot outs too as gross as that sounds.

Arpod
05-15-2012, 11:15 AM
Tolerance on the part of officials for the mob/scrum style of play is very much exaggerated in the playoffs relative to regular season games, IMHO. I, personally, don't view this as inherently good or bad; it simply is the way it has been done for so long it is not going to change. Quick whistles along the boards might make for more active play, as faceoffs create situations of imbalance and that is where skill and speed can take over. I am not, however, optimistic that at the NHL level we will see change though. That said, I don't anticipate it will filter down to college hockey to any significant extent, though that is not to say refereeing at the college level doesn't have its issues (and significant issues they are).

Osorojo
05-15-2012, 02:48 PM
In hockey I much prefer speed and skill to pushing and grappling. For that I will watch sumo wrestling, which is the ultimate pushing and grappling sport. Pushing and grappling and of course fighting has always appealed to a certain type of so-called "hockey fan" and sold a lot of tickets. The rise of the UFC has pulled a lot of these fans away from hockey.
I agree with gopheritall. Olympic/international sized ice surfaces promote skill, speed, agility and strategy in hockey, to the benefit of the game. I haven't checked, but I fear all the new college rinks under construction will feature NHL-sized rinks. This will speed the departure of early departues but will ultimately degrade the appeal of both "amateur" and professional hockey in the U.S..

FlagDUDE08
05-15-2012, 04:01 PM
In hockey I much prefer speed and skill to pushing and grappling. For that I will watch sumo wrestling, which is the ultimate pushing and grappling sport. Pushing and grappling and of course fighting has always appealed to a certain type of so-called "hockey fan" and sold a lot of tickets. The rise of the UFC has pulled a lot of these fans away from hockey.
I agree with gopheritall. Olympic/international sized ice surfaces promote skill, speed, agility and strategy in hockey, to the benefit of the game. I haven't checked, but I fear all the new college rinks under construction will feature NHL-sized rinks. This will speed the departure of early departues but will ultimately degarde the appeal of both "amateur" and professional hockey in the U.S..

I would have thought you'd prefer clutch, grab, and dive. ;)

stuckinwi
05-15-2012, 04:57 PM
I would have thought you'd prefer clutch, grab, and dive. ;)

Bears don't dive gracefully... Clutch and grab sure... but dive. No sir.

Osorojo
05-15-2012, 05:40 PM
I would have thought you'd prefer clutch, grab, and dive. ;)

DUDEO: That kind of stuff is pretty much confined to fans from the Three Rivers area and cheezy lovers of wildlife.

komey1
05-15-2012, 07:19 PM
Why would the size of the rink increase the amount of early departures. The bulk of the programs that have this problem already have this.

HumRsky
05-15-2012, 10:23 PM
Bandy sized ice! Hooray! ;)

I prefer the large ice too but...since so many college players are planning (or hoping) on playing in the NHL I reluctantly accept that ice size and many NHL rules will be pushed down to college. That includes the inevitable shoot outs too as gross as that sounds.

I like bandy:)

burd
05-15-2012, 10:52 PM
Why would the size of the rink increase the amount of early departures. The bulk of the programs that have this problem already have this.

He said it would speed the departure of early departures, which would mean reduce early departures, wouldn't it?

Fighting Sioux 23
05-16-2012, 01:33 PM
He said it would speed the departure of early departures, which would mean reduce early departures, wouldn't it?

Come on burd...NHL rinks are 15 feet narrower, so an early departure doesn't have to skate that extra 15 feet to depart, so that means that they will depart quicker (by 15 feet). It's not rocket science :p:D:D

Osorojo
05-16-2012, 01:59 PM
Nah. The smaller ice surface quickly accustoms top scholarship recruits to NHL-style shove-and-grapple hockey, meaning they can depart at or before the end of their freshman year [rather than their sophomore year] and a new class of one-and-done wonders can be recruited, trained, and depart the next year. That's clearly how trickle-down NHL rules, NHL enforcement, and NHL venue size will speed individual early departures and the overall early departure rate from college hockey. Don't play dumb unless you have no other option.

burd
05-16-2012, 03:27 PM
Nah. The smaller ice surface quickly accustoms top scholarship recruits to NHL-style shove-and-grapple hockey, meaning they can depart at or before the end of their freshman year [rather than their sophomore year] and a new class of one-and-done wonders can be recruited, trained, and depart the next year. That's clearly how trickle-down NHL rules, NHL enforcement, and NHL venue size will speed individual early departures and the overall early departure rate from college hockey. Don't play dumb unless you have no other option.

FS23, over the last 5 or 6 years how many UND players have moved on after one year compared to UMinn and UW, both of which are big sheet teams?

Oh, and thanks for explaining the whole 15 feet deal--I feel so stupid not to have seen that.

Fighting Sioux 23
05-16-2012, 03:36 PM
FS23, over the last 5 or 6 years how many UND players have moved on after one year compared to UMinn and UW, both of which are big sheet teams?

Oh, and thanks for explaining the whole 15 feet deal--I feel so stupid not to have seen that.

UND has had 0 one and done's (very few 2 and done's) in the last 6 years.
Minnesota has had 2 that I can think of (Kessell and E. Johnson). Okposo played 1.5 years.
Wisconsin has had 1 that I can think of (Turris).

wasmania
05-16-2012, 03:53 PM
Come on burd...NHL rinks are 15 feet narrower, so an early departure doesn't have to skate that extra 15 feet to depart, so that means that they will depart quicker (by 15 feet). It's not rocket science :p:D:D

I meesed depart where he splained depatures, most have been part-de ing too much

burd
05-16-2012, 04:21 PM
UND has had 0 one and done's (very few 2 and done's) in the last 6 years.
Minnesota has had 2 that I can think of (Kessell and E. Johnson). Okposo played 1.5 years.
Wisconsin has had 1 that I can think of (Turris).

Good work, as usual.

But how can that not fit with Oso's theory. Maybe UMinn and UW have grappling coaches to prepare them for the big show. Maybe a new grappling coach is behind Hak's decision to let Eades go. Is grappling changing the way we view college education?

komey1
05-16-2012, 07:15 PM
Nah. The smaller ice surface quickly accustoms top scholarship recruits to NHL-style shove-and-grapple hockey, meaning they can depart at or before the end of their freshman year [rather than their sophomore year] and a new class of one-and-done wonders can be recruited, trained, and depart the next year. That's clearly how trickle-down NHL rules, NHL enforcement, and NHL venue size will speed individual early departures and the overall early departure rate from college hockey. Don't play dumb unless you have no other option.

The flaw in the arguement is that not all teams play shove-and-grapple hockey, pro AND college. Not only that, I've seen several times in college hockey where the puck seems to be frozen on the boards for several second before the whistle is blown. And the rink I go to isn't even NHL regulation.

Osorojo
05-16-2012, 08:14 PM
For the last ten years every NCAA final four game has been played on NHL size 85'X200' ice. Seven of the last ten championship DI hockey teams play on home ice 87'X200' or smaller. Ten years ago was the last time a DI team with Olympic size 100'X200' ice won the NCAA championship. This is a flood of NHL influence on college hockey, not a trickle down. Ice surface size DOES influence the style of play, the priority of various hockey skills desired, and the selection of recruits. If you deny this you probably aren't just playing dumb. BTW: NHL rules and style of enforcement also influence college hockey. Ask around.

burd
05-16-2012, 09:36 PM
Nah. The smaller ice surface quickly accustoms top scholarship recruits to NHL-style shove-and-grapple hockey, meaning they can depart at or before the end of their freshman year [rather than their sophomore year] and a new class of one-and-done wonders can be recruited, trained, and depart the next year. That's clearly how trickle-down NHL rules, NHL enforcement, and NHL venue size will speed individual early departures and the overall early departure rate from college hockey. Don't play dumb unless you have no other option.

You may be right, but it would make it easier on those of us prone to being dumb if you had some statistics on the relationship between one-and-doners and sheet size.