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Thread: Concussions

  1. #141
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    Re: Concussions


  2. #142
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    Re: Concussions

    CFL Commissioner sidesteps the issue...but notice his steepling posture...

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/thenational/c...ions-1.3869191

  3. #143
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    Re: Concussions

    FYI:

    http://www.collegeathleteconcussionsettlement.com/

    Under proposed settlement, "The NCAA has also agreed to change its policies and procedures for concussion management and return to play."
    Last edited by thirdtime's . . .; 01-12-2017 at 12:43 PM.

  4. #144
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  6. #146
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    Re: Concussions

    Although I agree that concussions are a critical issue that needs way more study, this study was biased as outlined in the article itself:

    "The researchers noted that the study had limitations including that the subjects' brains were donated by their families, and that families were more likely to opt into the study if the players had showed symptoms of CTE."

  7. #147
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    Re: Concussions

    Quote Originally Posted by GTOWN View Post
    Although I agree that concussions are a critical issue that needs way more study, this study was biased as outlined in the article itself:

    "The researchers noted that the study had limitations including that the subjects' brains were donated by their families, and that families were more likely to opt into the study if the players had showed symptoms of CTE."
    Sure, the study is biased - but recognize that some portion of the donated brains were from players who did not exhibit significant symptoms of CTE.

    Setting that aside, let's say that the real number is 25% rather than 99%. Does that make anyone feel dramatically better? That a quarter of players are going to be cognitively impacted by playing? 10%? What's your threshold for concern?

    There is no doubt in my mind that based on the overwhelming evidence that football as a school sport should be stopped (and hockey may not be far behind for women in particular). What message does it send that schools support activities that are known to cause long term negative cognitive impacts? Certainly not one that can be justified if schools are really academic institutions.

  8. #148
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    Re: Concussions

    Quote Originally Posted by HockeyEast33 View Post
    Sure, the study is biased - but recognize that some portion of the donated brains were from players who did not exhibit significant symptoms of CTE.

    Setting that aside, let's say that the real number is 25% rather than 99%. Does that make anyone feel dramatically better? That a quarter of players are going to be cognitively impacted by playing? 10%? What's your threshold for concern?

    There is no doubt in my mind that based on the overwhelming evidence that football as a school sport should be stopped (and hockey may not be far behind for women in particular). What message does it send that schools support activities that are known to cause long term negative cognitive impacts? Certainly not one that can be justified if schools are really academic institutions.

    Certainly not undermining the importance of the study, quite the opposite. I firmly believe that not enough is being done to measure the impact / probability of concussions. There is a proven scientific way of doing peer reviewed research. Unfortunately there is no clear way to make money on this and our governments (I'm Canadian) don't see this as important enough....yet. Let's get a few good lawsuits going and then everyone will "recognize the right thing to do".

    I have 2 daughters, one plays D3 hockey the other plays recreationally, not sure what the threshold is. I'm just glad that I don't have a son and that I don't have to decide whether he plays football or not. Not sure I would ever let him play......

    I also believe that there are things we can do to make sports safer in general. In hockey for instance, lets get rid of the hard caps on elbow pads and shoulder pads. When I played it hurt to hit someone, so you were more careful and bodychecking/hitting was reserved for separating the player from the puck....not from his body.
    I wish we had more answers, I'm just not sure that having a very biased study out there will help convert the masses, too much of an easy out for the average mom and pop. The diehards on either side of the discussion will always be there. It's not until we get moms (and dads) voting with their recreational choices that any major changes will happen.

  9. #149
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    Re: Concussions

    One thing that might help is to put padding on the outside of helmets as well as the inside. The way they are designed now, when two helmets collide, the entire head/helmet combination comes to an abrupt stop, and the internal padding is trying to keep the head from decelerating at the same rate that the helmet does. External padding would reduce the entire structure's deceleration rate.

    I suspect that women's hockey has a significantly lower CTE rate than football or men's hockey, though there's a lot of research to be done before anyone could be sure of this. The concussion rate is worryingly high, but there's evidence that the main culprit in CTE is not the infrequent concussions, but rather the sub-concussive jolts that occur on every play in football, especially to linemen. There's a limit to how reassuring this should be even if true, since concussions have long term consequences separate from CTE.

  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eeyore View Post
    One thing that might help is to put padding on the outside of helmets as well as the inside. The way they are designed now, when two helmets collide, the entire head/helmet combination comes to an abrupt stop, and the internal padding is trying to keep the head from decelerating at the same rate that the helmet does. External padding would reduce the entire structure's deceleration rate.

    I suspect that women's hockey has a significantly lower CTE rate than football or men's hockey, though there's a lot of research to be done before anyone could be sure of this. The concussion rate is worryingly high, but there's evidence that the main culprit in CTE is not the infrequent concussions, but rather the sub-concussive jolts that occur on every play in football, especially to linemen. There's a limit to how reassuring this should be even if true, since concussions have long term consequences separate from CTE.
    Studies show a distinct genetic component

  11. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eeyore View Post
    One thing that might help is to put padding on the outside of helmets as well as the inside. The way they are designed now, when two helmets collide, the entire head/helmet combination comes to an abrupt stop, and the internal padding is trying to keep the head from decelerating at the same rate that the helmet does. External padding would reduce the entire structure's deceleration rate.
    Many, many years ago, long, long before CTE was even known, a football helmet manufacturer designed a helmet just like this -- with soft padding on the outside. It never got past the prototype phase because they were concerned teams would never buy them.

    Why? Because you wouldn't be able to display your team logo on the outside of the helmet. I kid you not.

  12. #152
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    Re: Concussions

    Article on concussion detection:

    PupilScreen aims to allow parents, coaches, medics to detect concussion, TBIs with a phone

    September 6, 2017 by Jennifer Langston





    PupilScreen aims to allow parents, coaches, medics to detect concussion, TBIs with a phone
    The UW researchers initially tested PupilScreen with a 3-D printed box that controls the eye's exposure to light. They are now training their deep learning algorithms to produce similar results with the smartphone camera alone. Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

    University of Washington researchers are developing the first smartphone app that is capable of objectively detecting concussion and other traumatic brain injuries in the field: on the sidelines of a sports game, on a battlefield or in the home of an elderly person prone to falls.





    PupilScreen can detect changes in a pupil's response to light using a smartphone's video camera and deep learning tools—a type of artificial intelligence—that can quantify changes imperceptible to the human eye.

    This pupillary light reflex has long been used to assess whether a patient has severe traumatic brain injury, and recent research finds it can be useful in detecting milder concussions—opening up an entirely new avenue for screening.

    The team of UW computer scientists, electrical engineers and medical researchers has demonstrated that PupilScreen can be used to detect instances of significant traumatic brain injury. A broader clinical study this fall will put PupilScreen in the hands of coaches, emergency medical technicians, doctors and others to gather more data on which pupillary response characteristics are most helpful in determining ambiguous cases of concussion. The researchers hope to release a commercially available version of PupilScreen within two years.

    "Having an objective measure that a coach or parent or anyone on the sidelines of a game could use to screen for concussion would truly be a game-changer," said Shwetak Patel, the Washington Research Foundation Endowed Professor of Computer Science & Engineering and of Electrical Engineering at the UW. "Right now the best screening protocols we have are still subjective, and a player who really wants to get back on the field can find ways to game the system."

    As described in a paper to be presented Sept. 13 at Ubicomp 2017, PupilScreen can assess a patient's pupillary light reflex almost as well as a pupilometer, an expensive and rarely used machine found only in hospitals. It uses the smartphone's flash to stimulate the patient's eyes and the video camera to record a three-second video.



    The video is processed using deep learning algorithms that can determine which pixels belong to the pupil in each video frame and measure the changes in pupil size across those frames. In a small pilot study that combined 48 results from patients with traumatic brain injury and from healthy people, clinicians were able to diagnose the brain injuries with almost perfect accuracy using the app's output alone.

    In amateur sports today, even the best practices that coaches or parents use if an athlete is suspected of a concussion during a game—asking them where they are, to repeat a list of words, balancing, touching a finger to their nose—essentially consist of subjective assessment.

    By contrast, PupilScreen aims to generate objective and clinically relevant data that anyone on the sidelines could use to determine whether a player should be further assessed for concussion or other brain injury.




    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates about half of the 3.8 million concussions per year in the U.S. from recreational sports injuries alone still go undiagnosed, putting millions of young players and adults at risk for future head injury and permanent cognitive deficits.

    Historically, there's been no surefire way to diagnose concussion—even in the emergency room, said co-author Dr. Lynn McGrath, a resident physician in UW Medicine's Department of Neurological Surgery. Doctors usually run tests to rule out worst cases like a brain bleed or skull fracture. After more serious head injuries are excluded, a diagnosis of concussion can be made.

    Medical professionals have long used the pupillary light reflex—usually in the form of a penlight test where they shine a light into a patient's eyes—to assess severe forms of brain injury. But a growing body of medical research has recently found that more subtle changes in pupil response can be useful in detecting milder concussions.

    "PupilScreen aims to fill that gap by giving us the first capability to measure an objective biomarker of concussion in the field," McGrath said. "After further testing, we think this device will empower everyone from Little League coaches to NFL doctors to emergency department physicians to rapidly detect and triage head injury."


    PupilScreen aims to allow parents, coaches, medics to detect concussion, TBIs with a phone
    PupilScreen combines a smartphone's flash and video camera with machine learning tools to track how the eye's pupil reacts to light. The app can currently distinguish between the pupillary light reflex of healthy people (shown above) and …more

    While the UW team initially tested PupilScreen with a 3-D printed box to control the eye's exposure to light, researchers are now training their machine learning neural network to produce similar results with the smartphone camera alone.

    "The vision we're shooting for is having someone simply hold the phone up and use the flash. We want every parent, coach, caregiver or EMT who is concerned about a brain injury to be able to use it on the spot without needing extra hardware," said lead author Alex Mariakakis, a doctoral student in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering.

    One of the challenges in developing PupilScreen involved training the machine learning tools to distinguish between the eye's pupil and iris, which involved annotating roughly 4,000 images of eyes by hand. A computer has the advantage of being able to quantify subtle changes in the pupillary light reflex that the human eye cannot perceive.

    "Instead of designing an algorithm to solve the specific problem of measuring pupil response, we moved this to a machine learning approach—collecting a lot of data and writing an algorithm that allowed the computer to learn for itself," said co-author Jacob Baudin, a UW medical student and doctoral student in physiology and biophysics.

    The PupilScreen researchers are currently working to identify partners interested in conducting additional field studies of the app, which they expect to begin in October.

    Explore further: Know the signs of concussion



    Provided by: University of Washington search and more info website




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    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-pupils...ssion.html#jCp

  13. #153
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    Re: Concussions

    Something else for parents to think about and for young athletes to consider...

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/football-age-1.4306067

  14. #154
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    Re: Concussions

    This is terrible...a concussion jackpot!!

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-br...tans-1.4355765

  15. #155
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    Re: Concussions

    The numbers are getting to the point where they are off the chart...

    http://www.cbc.ca/sports/olympics/co...etes-1.4364498

  16. #156
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    Re: Concussions

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbeard View Post
    The numbers are getting to the point where they are off the chart...

    http://www.cbc.ca/sports/olympics/co...etes-1.4364498
    Human bodies were never meant to take the forces these kids can generate. I hope someone is working very hard to find prevention because the athletes themselves are not going to stop.

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