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Thread: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by mookie1995 View Post
    Every person in the country could / should be seen as a potential future voter (citizen).
    That's a sensible answer, thanks. Immigrants could become naturalized citizens just as children can survive into adulthood.
    "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by unofan View Post
    Now it's my turn to regret posting, because obvious concern troll is obviously concerned...



    If you're the strict Constitutionalist you and your idol Scalia claim to be, the answer is readily apparent. Apportioned by persons, not citizens. You don't get to exclude kids, immigrants, and felons.
    Interesting. Does that imply illegals, refugees, etc.?

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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by joecct View Post
    And do you think MD Senate President Mike Miller (de facto Governor), is willingly going to give up his king making power?
    Who cares? I am saying what should be done. Unless the Court rules that the political division of districts is intrinsically unconstitutional, it won't happen. We won't defeat gerrymandering by appealing to the good graces of legislatures any more than we'll defeat voter suppression by appealing to the good graces of the Republicans. We will have to wrest control from the corrupt, just as we always had to in the past with the extension of the franchise, direct election of Senators, elimination of Jim Crow 1.0, etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kepler View Post
    Who cares? I am saying what should be done. Unless the Court rules that the political division of districts is intrinsically unconstitutional, it won't happen. We won't defeat gerrymandering by appealing to the good graces of legislatures any more than we'll defeat voter suppression by appealing to the good graces of the Republicans. We will have to wrest control from the corrupt, just as we always had to in the past with the extension of the franchise, direct election of Senators, elimination of Jim Crow 1.0, etc.
    Utopias don't exist except in minds of revolutionaries or saints. What are you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    Interesting. Does that imply illegals, refugees, etc.?
    Yep. The census is supposed to include everyone.

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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by unofan View Post
    Yep. The census is supposed to include everyone.
    Even more interesting. Thanks for the lesson.

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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by joecct View Post
    Utopias don't exist except in minds of revolutionaries or saints. What are you?
    "We can never be perfect so it's pointless to try to improve." -- Deep Thoughts by joecct
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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    Interesting. Does that imply illegals, refugees, etc.?
    When I was a Census-taker, yes. Our only job was verifiably to count as many people as we could find without regard to anything else. Did not ask about citizenship, criminal status, etc., just "how many people are there?" even counted the homeless.
    "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

    "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

    "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

    "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kepler View Post
    "We can never be perfect so it's pointless to try to improve." -- Deep Thoughts by joecct
    It is the Tao of Joe. The collary is "Reality bites. Be happy with what you can achieve in the legislature."

    And let us not forget The Facts of Life as presented by Lazlo Zalezac

    The Facts Of Life
    Life is not fair.
    No one is exempt from death.
    Physics rules the universe and biology rules life.
    The universe does not care.
    The only constant in life is change.
    There is always a choice.
    Wishing never makes it so.
    A person can't exceed their limits.
    A person is responsible for their own happiness.
    It is impossible to change the character of another
    But, please answer the question.
    Last edited by joecct; 12-29-2017 at 10:31 AM.

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    Re: Power of the SCOTUS IX: The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SCOTUS nine that day

    Quote Originally Posted by joecct View Post
    It is the Tao of Joe. The collary is "Reality bites. Be happy with what you can achieve in the legislature."

    And let us not forget The Facts of Life as presented by Lazlo Zalezac


    But, please answer the question.
    A Steppenwolf, of course.

    Hermine looked tenderly in my eyes with that dark look that could so suddenly come into her
    face. Lovely, fearful eyes! Picking her words one by one and piecing them together, and
    speaking slowly and so low that it was an effort to hear her, she said:

    "I want to tell you something today, something that I have known for a long while, and you
    know it too; but perhaps you have never said it to yourself. I am going to tell you now what it is
    that I know about you and me and our fate. You, Harry, have been an artist and a thinker, a man
    full of joy and faith, always on the track of what is great and eternal, never content with the
    trivial and petty. But the more life has awakened you and brought you back to yourself, the
    greater has your need been and the deeper the sufferings and dread and despair that have
    overtaken you, till you were up to your neck in them. And all that you once knew and loved and
    revered as beautiful and sacred, all the belief you once had in mankind and our high destiny, has
    been of no avail and has lost its worth and gone to pieces. Your faith found no more air to
    breathe. And suffocation is a hard death. Is that true, Harry? Is that your fate?"

    I nodded again and again.

    "You have a picture of life within you, a faith, a challenge, and you were ready for deeds and
    sufferings and sacrifices, and then you became aware by degrees that the world asked no deeds
    and no sacrifices of you whatever, and that life is no poem of heroism with heroic parts to play
    and so on, but a comfortable room where people are quite content with eating and drinking,
    coffee and knitting, cards and wireless. And whoever wants more and has got it in him—the
    heroic and the beautiful, and the reverence for the great poets or for the saints—is a fool and a
    Don Quixote. Good. And it has been just the same for me, my friend. I was a gifted girl. I was
    meant to live up to a high standard, to expect much of myself and do great things. I could have
    played a great part. I could have been the wife of a king, the beloved of a revolutionary, the sister
    of a genius, the mother of a martyr. And life has allowed me just this, to be a courtesan of fairly
    good taste, and even that has been hard enough. That is how things have gone with me. For a
    while I was inconsolable and for a long time I put the blame on myself. Life, thought I, must in
    the end be in the right, and if life scorned my beautiful dreams, so I argued, it was my dreams
    that were stupid and wrong headed. But that did not help me at all. And as I had good eyes and
    ears and was a little inquisitive too, I took a good look at this so-called life and at my neighbors
    and acquaintances, fifty or so of them and their destinies, and then I saw you. And I knew that
    my dreams had been right a thousand times over, just as yours had been. It was life and reality
    that were wrong. It was as little right that a woman like me should have no other choice than to
    grow old in poverty and in a senseless way at a typewriter in the pay of a money-maker, or to
    marry such a man for his money's sake, or to become some kind of drudge, as for a man like you
    to be forced in his loneliness and despair to have recourse to a razor. Perhaps the trouble with me
    was more material and moral and with you more spiritual—but it was the same road. Do you
    think I can't understand your horror of the fox trot, your dislike of bars and dancing floors, your
    loathing of jazz and the rest of it? I understand it only too well, and your dislike of politics as
    well, your despondence over the chatter and irresponsible antics of the parties and the press, your
    despair over the war, the one that has been and the one that is to be, over all that people
    nowadays think, read and build, over the music they play, the celebrations they hold, the
    education they carry on. You are right, Steppenwolf, right a thousand times over, and yet you
    must go to the wall. You are much too exacting and hungry for this simple, easygoing and easily
    contented world of today. You have a dimension too many. Whoever wants to live and enjoy his
    life today must not be like you and me. Whoever wants music instead of noise, joy instead of
    pleasure, soul instead of gold, creative work instead of business, passion instead of foolery, finds
    no home in this trivial world of ours—"

    She looked down and fell into meditation.

    "Hermine," I cried tenderly, "sister, how clearly you see! And yet you taught me the fox trot!
    But how do you mean that people like us with a dimension too many cannot live here? What
    brings it about? Is it only so in our days, or was it so always?"

    "I don't know. For the honor of the world, I will suppose it to be in our time only—a disease,
    a momentary misfortune. Our leaders strain every nerve, and with success, to get the next war
    going, while the rest of us, meanwhile, dance the fox trot, earn money and eat chocolates—in
    such a time the world must indeed cut a poor figure. Let us hope that other times were better, and
    will be better again, richer, broader and deeper. But that is no help to us now. And perhaps it has
    always been the same—"

    "Always as it is today? Always a world only for politicians, profiteers, waiters and pleasureseekers,
    and not a breath of air for men?"

    "Well, I don't know. Nobody knows. Anyway, it is all the same. But I am thinking now of
    your favorite of whom you have talked to me sometimes, and read me, too, some of his letters, of
    Mozart. How was it with him in his day? Who controlled things in his times and ruled the roost
    and gave the tone and counted for something? Was it Mozart or the business people, Mozart or
    the average man? And in what fashion did he come to die and be buried? And perhaps, I mean, it
    has always been the same and always will be, and what is called history at school, and all we
    learn by heart there about heroes and geniuses and great deeds and fine emotions, is all nothing
    but a swindle invented by the schoolmasters for educational reasons to keep children occupied
    for a given number of years. It has always been so and always will be. Time and the world,
    money and power belong to the small people and the shallow people. To the rest, to the real men
    belongs nothing. Nothing but death."

    "Nothing else?"

    "Yes, eternity."

    "You mean a name, and fame with posterity?"

    "No, Steppenwolf, not fame. Has that any value? And do you think that all true and real men
    have been famous and known to posterity?"

    "No, of course not."

    "Then it isn't fame. Fame exists in that sense only for the schoolmasters. No, it isn't fame. It is
    what I call eternity. The pious call it the kingdom of God. I say to myself: all we who ask too
    much and have a dimension too many could not contrive to live at all if there were not another
    air to breathe outside the air of this world, if there were not eternity at the back of time; and this
    is the kingdom of truth. The music of Mozart belongs there and the poetry of your great poets.
    The saints, too, belong there, who have worked wonders and suffered martyrdom and given a
    great example to men. But the image of every true act, the strength of every true feeling, belongs
    to eternity just as much, even though no one knows of it or sees it or records it or hands it down
    to posterity. In eternity there is no posterity."
    That's what Christmas is all about, Charlie Brown.
    Last edited by Kepler; 12-29-2017 at 10:58 AM.
    2016 USCHO POSER OF THE YEAR

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    ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
    Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014

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