Page 2 of 12 FirstFirst 1234567891011 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 237

Thread: The thread for birds and birding

  1. #21
    Master of Science
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    3,548

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Spring is here. I am starting to see more of the migratory birds showing up. Had 2 Rose breasted grosbeaks partaking in some safflower. Today I had a hummingbird show up in my back yard (Ruby-throated) looking for food. Problem is I dont have a hummingbird feeder yet. He must have just heard from all other other birds that I have the greatest restaraunt in the area. haha. Will probably pick up a hummingbird feeder and make some sugar water sometime this week. Counting the hummingbird thats 27 species at the feeders since i put them up in January (that I have seen and know of).

    Also wanted to post this. The Indiana DNR has worked with AEP (a power company) to place a nest box at the top of the 26 story AEP building in Fort Wayne, IN. There is a nesting pair of Peregrine Falcons using the nest and they have a cam up there so you can watch the nest. Looks like its not live per say but takes a photo every 15 seconds. Looks like they may be sitting on an egg...not sure. Here is the link: http://www.aep.com/environment/falconcam/

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Edina, MN, USA
    Posts
    19,866

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    There is a loon in our pond right now. Not a usual visitor here in the suburbs, but our pond is one of the few open water spots around this year. Been quite a few of the usual buffle heads and similar migrating ducks but the loon is a little unusual here.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    between Scylla and Charybdis
    Posts
    8,687

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    I don't know if there is a website that does this, or if other cities have something similar. In the Boston Science Museum, they have an exhibit with lots of different kinds of birds in it (replicas not the real thing) and on a computer screen nearby you can pick one and play its call. It was quite instructive: I can hear maybe six or eight different kinds of bird calls where we live and to be able to associate the call with the bird making it is quite helpful.
    "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

    "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

    "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

    "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

  4. #24
    Gurtholfin
    Guest

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by goldy_331 View Post
    There is a loon in our pond right now. Not a usual visitor here in the suburbs, but our pond is one of the few open water spots around this year. Been quite a few of the usual buffle heads and similar migrating ducks but the loon is a little unusual here.

    I would guess your larger urban lakes get them each year?

    They stop here in Madison each spring. My wife works downtown and hears them in the morning, which she says is quite surreal as it's a sound she used to only associate with the North Woods.

    I've gone down and shot photos a few times as you can get them right from shore or from the Monona Terrace. Here's the best one I've gotten...

    *******http://i820.***********.com/albums/zz128/Gurtholfin/Loon_zps060cb1f0.jpg********


    This fellow was about 40 yards from the Terrace.

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Edina, MN, USA
    Posts
    19,866

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by Gurtholfin View Post
    I would guess your larger urban lakes get them each year?
    Correct. But this year the larger lakes are still ice locked. I should clarify that the pond we live on would be a lake in Wisconsin - it's about 5 acres and 'Sconny uses 1 acre as the cut-off. In MN it's a pond.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Manchester, NH US
    Posts
    2,974
    Quote Originally Posted by FreshFish View Post
    I don't know if there is a website that does this, or if other cities have something similar. In the Boston Science Museum, they have an exhibit with lots of different kinds of birds in it (replicas not the real thing) and on a computer screen nearby you can pick one and play its call. It was quite instructive: I can hear maybe six or eight different kinds of bird calls where we live and to be able to associate the call with the bird making it is quite helpful.
    Try the Cornell lab of ornithology all about birds. Enter the bird you are looking for and yu will get all the info including the calls.
    I would also recommend birding.aba.org. The site will provide you with a link to every states most recent bird sightings.

  7. #27
    Gurtholfin
    Guest

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    So, driving in my neighborhood and come upon what appears to be a rabbit chasing a crow across a front lawn as it is taking off. As we get closer the crow becomes airborne and flies about 15 feet in front of us and we can clearly see the baby bunny in its beak. Mama rabbit was left on the lawn looking clueless as ever.

    I'm the first to hate on the billion or so rabbits that are in our hood, but I didn't need to see that.


    A few years ago a crow had a baby squirrel treed in our back yard and I chased it off. Didn't need to sit there and watch it dismember a baby squirrel. Plus, we have a certain simpatico with the squirrels in our yard.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Edina, MN, USA
    Posts
    19,866
    Quote Originally Posted by Gurtholfin View Post
    Plus, we have a certain simpatico with the squirrels in our yard.
    Squirrels of a feather?

  9. #29
    Gurtholfin
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by goldy_331 View Post
    Squirrels of a feather?

    I feed them my nuts.


  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    333

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    So I'm not really much into birding personally, but I saw something kinda interesting yesterday. There's a hummingbird in the back yard that we've seen off and on for a good while now, but I just noticed yesterday it had this odd pattern. It would stay still, hovering about 10-15 feet above the ground over a small tree or bush, making some soft chirping/peeping sounds, for probably about 10 seconds or so. Then it would fly pretty much straight up, I'd guess at least 100 feet, and then do this J shaped dive-bomb between our house and the neighbor's, stopping and hovering over the tree again. Somewhere from the bottom of the J to the hover point, it made a much louder, single chirp. It followed this pattern for at least a good 10 minutes, and that's just when I started watching.

    The tree is actually in the neighbor's yard, and behind hedges, so we couldn't see what was in there. We were thinking maybe there was a squirrel, bird, or nest in the tree, and maybe there was some harassment going on one way or the other, but couldn't tell for sure. Anyway, I was just wondering if you guys had seen something like that before, or knew what it was doing?

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    between Scylla and Charybdis
    Posts
    8,687

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Gurt's post from earlier today reminded me of something spectacular that happened to us back in 1999 when we lived in the southwest corner of Wyoming. Usually, when we drove into Salt Lake City, we'd take I-80 the whole way. For this trip, though, we decided to take county roads through the mountains to get there instead.

    We are driving along, listening to Chestnut Mare by The Byrds, while the section quoted below is playing, when we drive past the carcass of a dead mule deer, upon which an eagle is feeding. It starts flying along next to us, maybe 12 feet away, no further, at the same speed we are driving, about 8 feet off the ground, for maybe 250 feet or more.

    We are all agog. The kids still remark on it 14 years later as one of the most amazing things in their life, having an eagle escort us (or us escort the eagle) for a stretch of roadway like that.


    Talk about synchronicity! Music by the Byrds, lyrics about an eagle, as a wild eagle flies alongside us, keeping pace.



    Well she takes off, runnin' up on to that ridge
    Higher than I've ever been before
    She's runnin' along just fine, till she stops
    Something spooked her
    It's a sidewinder, all coiled and ready to strike
    She doesn't know what to do for a second
    But then she jumps off the edge
    Me holding on

    Above the clouds
    Higher than eagles were gliding
    Suspended in the sky
    Last edited by FreshFish; 05-10-2013 at 02:41 PM.
    "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

    "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

    "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

    "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

  12. #32
    Master of Science
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    3,548

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by AKJD View Post
    So I'm not really much into birding personally, but I saw something kinda interesting yesterday. There's a hummingbird in the back yard that we've seen off and on for a good while now, but I just noticed yesterday it had this odd pattern. It would stay still, hovering about 10-15 feet above the ground over a small tree or bush, making some soft chirping/peeping sounds, for probably about 10 seconds or so. Then it would fly pretty much straight up, I'd guess at least 100 feet, and then do this J shaped dive-bomb between our house and the neighbor's, stopping and hovering over the tree again. Somewhere from the bottom of the J to the hover point, it made a much louder, single chirp. It followed this pattern for at least a good 10 minutes, and that's just when I started watching.

    The tree is actually in the neighbor's yard, and behind hedges, so we couldn't see what was in there. We were thinking maybe there was a squirrel, bird, or nest in the tree, and maybe there was some harassment going on one way or the other, but couldn't tell for sure. Anyway, I was just wondering if you guys had seen something like that before, or knew what it was doing?
    It's a dive display. Likely defending/defining his territory.

    On another note, I had species numbers 28 and 29 visit my feeders this morning. Some indigo buntings and a gray catbird.

    My full list: Carolina wren, white breasted nuthatch, redbreasted nuthatch, cardinal, white thorated sparrow, white crowned sparrow, house sparrow, house finch, purple finch, goldfinch, tufted titmouse, red bellied woodpecker, downy woodpecker, dark eyed junco, bluejay, grackle, starling, red wing blackbird, brown headed cowbird, morning dove, eastern towhee, northern mockingbird, hairy woodpecker, brown thrasher, carolina chickadee, rose breasted grosbeak, ruby throated hummingbird, indigo bunting and gray catbird.

  13. #33
    Still upright
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    6,447

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    My son is big into Birding and so during spring training this year we would go birding in the morning and a game in the afternoon. in 3 days we saw over 40 species. An arugula was one I had never heard of until then. Also saw a kingfisher for the first time, a really cool little bird.
    MTU: Three time NCAA champions.

    It never get's easier, you just go faster. -Greg Lemond

  14. #34
    Gurtholfin
    Guest

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    As I was making coffee this morning, I looked out and saw a female oriole on one of our patio chairs. She was looking at a bright orange squirt gun that was on the table, probably wondering if it was edible.

    I've never seen an oriole here before, but they do spend the summer throughout Wisconsin.

    I put an orange slice up on top of the playset. Hope she (and he) comes back.

  15. #35

    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Oregon, WI
    Posts
    2,779

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by Gurtholfin View Post
    As I was making coffee this morning, I looked out and saw a female oriole on one of our patio chairs. She was looking at a bright orange squirt gun that was on the table, probably wondering if it was edible.

    I've never seen an oriole here before, but they do spend the summer throughout Wisconsin.

    I put an orange slice up on top of the playset. Hope she (and he) comes back.
    We have several pairs of orioles every spring, and we have great luck feeding them grape jelly. We use this feeder http://www.amazon.com/Droll-Yankees-...m_sbs_indust_1 and put about half of one of the larger jars of jelly in it. They really go nuts for it.
    "This world is your world. Take it easy, but take it." - Woody Guthrie

  16. #36
    Gurtholfin
    Guest

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by Carter View Post
    We have several pairs of orioles every spring, and we have great luck feeding them grape jelly. We use this feeder http://www.amazon.com/Droll-Yankees-...m_sbs_indust_1 and put about half of one of the larger jars of jelly in it. They really go nuts for it.

    Seriously? Does the jelly attract bees & wasps?


    Do the orioles stay or are the migrating?

    I always thought that they migrate, but I read today that their summer territory is the whole state.

  17. #37

    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Oregon, WI
    Posts
    2,779

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by Gurtholfin View Post
    Seriously? Does the jelly attract bees & wasps?


    Do the orioles stay or are the migrating?

    I always thought that they migrate, but I read today that their summer territory is the whole state.
    Oh, absolutely seriously. Jelly is recommended in most bird books as food for orioles. They look pretty funny with goobers of it hanging from their beaks. We have an occasional bee around it, but that's about all. The house finches and purple finches may stop by to eat it too. Plus, it generally keeps until it's gone. I guess once in a while we pull it down when there's still some old ratty jelly in it for a cleaning and refill, but usually we wait until it's empty. The orioles are nesting on or around our property, but they show up a lot less frequently during the heart of summer. We always figured it was due to the richness of the natural foods becoming available.
    "This world is your world. Take it easy, but take it." - Woody Guthrie

  18. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Edina, MN, USA
    Posts
    19,866

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by Gurtholfin View Post
    As I was making coffee this morning, I looked out and saw a female oriole on one of our patio chairs. She was looking at a bright orange squirt gun that was on the table, probably wondering if it was edible.

    I've never seen an oriole here before, but they do spend the summer throughout Wisconsin.

    I put an orange slice up on top of the playset. Hope she (and he) comes back.
    My next door neighbor used to feed the orioles and we had one pair nest in our silver maple last summer. That neighbor has since moved away, maybe I should try to feed them now to see if they'll stick around.

  19. #39
    On any given night...
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    2,343

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    I thought you birders might like this from Slate.com:

    What the State Birds Should Be
    NMU Hockey Since 1976 ...there at the beginning.

    Bill Crawford, LSSU radio announcer, on NMU hockey: "This is their MO right to the tee: get out shot, get out played, keep hangin' in there, just rope-a-dope it in your own zone, get it up the ice, bang it in and win the game."

  20. #40
    Master of Science
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    3,548

    Re: The thread for birds and birding

    Quote Originally Posted by aygwm2 View Post
    I thought you birders might like this from Slate.com:

    What the State Birds Should Be
    As a birder this may be the funniest thing I have ever read. And I agree with the author on every single one.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •