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BlueDevilRadio
07-23-2009, 01:08 PM
Unrealized by many DIII schools last year, the NCAA actaully prohhibited the use of social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter fearing prospective recruits could be consuming that information. Members of the DIII committee put some pressure on the NCAA and just the other day resolved their legislation for using such sites.

You may recall myself using Twitter to keep fans and parents updated when UW-Stout wen't out to Lake Placid, NY last spring. Those following the tweets and Stouthockey.com (http://www.stouthockey.com) were able to get hourly updates on what the team was doing and where we were.

Here is an excerpt from a NCAA press release ---

"DENVER – Division III institutions now are free to use such media as Facebook and Twitter to publicize game results and other athletics news without worrying whether prospective student-athletes are receiving those “electronically transmitted” messages, provided the communication meets some new objective guidelines established by the Division III Management Council.

The Council agreed this week, in chair Lynn Oberbillig’s word, to “liberalize” 2008 legislation that has prohibited sending any electronically transmitted correspondence other than an e-mail or fax – including any type of message via social-networking media – to prospects.

Council members approved the recommendation from the Division III Interpretations and Legislation Committee as noncontroversial legislation and also approved the language of the revised bylaw, meaning that it became effective Tuesday upon adjournment of the Council’s summer meeting.

The Council also made application of the new standard retroactive to August 2008, when the original legislation became effective. That action relieves schools of the requirement to report violations in cases where prospects may have received information available to anyone seeking it via social media.

Institutions and coaches still are prohibited from using social-networking media, as well as such tools as texting or instant messaging, to communicate personally with a specific prospect. Communication with prospects via phone, e-mail and fax continues to be permitted.

The Division III Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, a prime force behind adoption of the 2008 legislation because of its stance that recruiting via electronic technology should be neither intrusive nor informal, supported the change. SAAC representatives on the Council said the original legislation’s intent is preserved by the revised bylaw’s requirement that prospects must be given the ability to decline receipt or “unsubscribe” from receiving information from an institution.

“Our original worry was with single text messages, which we felt were unprofessional and placed undue, one-on-one pressure on a student-athlete,” said Erin Wojtkun of Christopher Newport, one of SAAC’s two Management Council members.

“We felt the restrictions in the new legislation, with no one-on-one contact and that it’s general in nature, makes it a prospective student-athlete’s choice to receive the message. We decided (social networking) is a new technology and it’s how new students are getting information. So, we don’t want to close it off, because we want as many Division III athletes as possible to learn what it really means to be a Division III athlete.”

The revised bylaw does not specify the types of information that may be transmitted by institutions, simply terming it “general athletics information.” But the Interpretations and Legislation Committee has suggested that it is the same type of information available to the public through a school’s Web site, such as “general media reports, scores and other public information.”
"

Not really hockey related but an interesting read none the less

Matthew Webb
07-23-2009, 01:35 PM
Those following the tweets and Stouthockey.com (http://www.stouthockey.com) were able to get hourly updates on what the team was doing and where we were.[/I]

Sneaking in the shameless plug! Of course, that is something I unequivocally approve of. :cool:

I do have a question regarding your 6/1 post, however: How could the NCAA rules apply to something like that? I understand the (pointless) limits on liveblogging championship events and such, and the concerns over institutions themselves using some of these new gadgets to go after recruits, but what policies were there that applied to something like you were doing?

Speaking of shameless plugs, I'm working on putting together a West Region Blog (www.thefrozenfrontier.blogspot.com) (still have to add about five stories and a pile of links) to cover some stories that don't get play anywhere and quite frankly, I'll say what I want when I want.

PSUChamps2001
07-23-2009, 02:17 PM
Speaking of shameless plugs, I'm working on putting together a West Region Blog (www.thefrozenfrontier.blogspot.com) (still have to add about five stories and a pile of links) to cover some stories that don't get play anywhere and quite frankly, I'll say what I want when I want.


I know we've had talks about this before and can't wait for you to come out with it. Break down the PC wall and bring it on!!

BlueDevilRadio
07-23-2009, 02:25 PM
I do have a question regarding your 6/1 post, however: How could the NCAA rules apply to something like that? I understand the (pointless) limits on liveblogging championship events and such, and the concerns over institutions themselves using some of these new gadgets to go after recruits, but what policies were there that applied to something like you were doing?



13.02.10 Electronic Transmissions. Electronically transmitted correspondence that may be sent to a prospective student-athlete by, or on behalf of, a member of the institution's athletics department staff is limited to electronic mail and facsimiles. All other forms of electronically transmitted correspondence (e.g., instant messaging, text messaging and social networking Web sites) are prohibited except as specified in this section.

That was the bylaw that would have been a violation and the NCAA is still requesting if you violated unknowningly to still report it. Now exceptions have been added to cover social networking sites, though there is still some lines drawn in the sand.

You may ask how could schools 'unknowingly' violate this bylaw. The confusion to my understanding is if a potential DIII athlete joins a Facebook fan page or follows an athletic department on Twitter, is that direct one-on-one correspondance.

DIII members argued they are only replicating information found on their website on different platforms and they can't control who follows it. It is in the public domain on the web anyway.

Here are the exceptions...

(a) Any member of the general public may become a member of the group to which the electronic transmission is sent;

(b) A prospective student-athlete who chooses to receive electronic transmissions through the electronic service must retain the ability to decline receipt of the communications at any time or may unsubscribe from the electronic service at any time; and

(c) The content of any electronic transmission that is sent to a public group that may include prospective student-athletes must be the same for all members of the group (e.g., news alerts, admissions and alumni information, scores) and of a general nature.

Check your e-mail for the down and dirty Webb. :D

Matthew Webb
07-23-2009, 03:04 PM
13.02.10 Electronic Transmissions. Electronically transmitted correspondence that may be sent to a prospective student-athlete by, or on behalf of, a member of the institution's athletics department staff is limited to electronic mail and facsimiles. All other forms of electronically transmitted correspondence (e.g., instant messaging, text messaging and social networking Web sites) are prohibited except as specified in this section.

That was the bylaw that would have been a violation and the NCAA is still requesting if you violated unknowningly to still report it. Now exceptions have been added to cover social networking sites, though there is still some lines drawn in the sand.

You may ask how could schools 'unknowingly' violate this bylaw. The confusion to my understanding is if a potential DIII athlete joins a Facebook fan page or follows an athletic department on Twitter, is that direct one-on-one correspondance.

DIII members argued they are only replicating information found on their website on different platforms and they can't control who follows it. It is in the public domain on the web anyway.

Here are the exceptions...

(a) Any member of the general public may become a member of the group to which the electronic transmission is sent;

(b) A prospective student-athlete who chooses to receive electronic transmissions through the electronic service must retain the ability to decline receipt of the communications at any time or may unsubscribe from the electronic service at any time; and

(c) The content of any electronic transmission that is sent to a public group that may include prospective student-athletes must be the same for all members of the group (e.g., news alerts, admissions and alumni information, scores) and of a general nature.

Check your e-mail for the down and dirty Webb. :D

Does that apply to anything you were doing? The way I read it...it doesn't. You weren't sending anyone, and least of all potential recruits, anything through a networking site, but rather were just chronicling the <strike>Frozen Four</strike> NCAA Championship experience.

Dare I ask: Am I missing something?

Matthew Webb
07-23-2009, 03:09 PM
I know we've had talks about this before and can't wait for you to come out with it. Break down the PC wall and bring it on!!

By and large it's not going to be edgy or anything. Just a way to disperse more information on the region in general. For example, tonight (hopefully) I plan to add something a new assistant coach at a MIAC school. Nothing major for sure, but it's not like that gets mentioned anywhere else.

I do hope to use it to add perhaps a little more editorial/opinion than I do otherwise, but either way I thought it was a good idea to keep all sorts of information nice and organized in one place. For example: the fact the tourney is going back to Placid this year. Aside from insiders mentioning it on here and a release from the NCAA norm1909 linked to it really hasn't been mentioned anywhere.

Maybe it's just me, but it seems like rather significant news someone should point out.

pete99race
07-23-2009, 06:58 PM
By and large it's not going to be edgy or anything. Just a way to disperse more information on the region in general. For example, tonight (hopefully) I plan to add something a new assistant coach at a MIAC school. Nothing major for sure, but it's not like that gets mentioned anywhere else.

I do hope to use it to add perhaps a little more editorial/opinion than I do otherwise, but either way I thought it was a good idea to keep all sorts of information nice and organized in one place. For example: the fact the tourney is going back to Placid this year. Aside from insiders mentioning it on here and a release from the NCAA norm1909 linked to it really hasn't been mentioned anywhere.

Maybe it's just me, but it seems like rather significant news someone should point out.This should be fun!!!!

BlueDevilRadio
07-23-2009, 10:32 PM
Does that apply to anything you were doing? The way I read it...it doesn't. You weren't sending anyone, and least of all potential recruits, anything through a networking site, but rather were just chronicling the <strike>Frozen Four</strike> NCAA Championship experience.

Dare I ask: Am I missing something?

Before the resolution to the bylaw, it was a violation for me as an SID employee to disperse information in a 'official' capacity like I was on a social network because a recruit could see it. Is chronicling my experience on Twitter an 'official' communication, I guess so?!

That is why the NCAA was under so much pressure from DIII schools. The bylaw was stifling DIII schools from advancement in communication technologies within athletics.

Now with the resolution, they stated to review everything a DIII athletics department did in social/new media since August of 08 and see if it would violate the newly resolved by-law, which we personally DID NOT. Not at any time did I send direct messages nor intend certain messages for anyone. So technically the answer is NO. We we're in compliance the entire time because they resolved it back an entire year, not starting from now on.

:D Don't worry my head is spinning to.

P.S. - I think that Western Region Blog deserves its own .com, not a Blogger sub!